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Question when you guys do your steam engines ovet do u leave the shell as is to keep it original or do u repaint it if do do u use a flat black or satin finish thanks one other quetion on the rails what do u use to clean and get them back to shine thanks al
 

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I have close to 20 AF steamers. I try to buy locomotives with
good paint. It just does not always happen. I have one repainted
steamer, it is very nice. I have one that needs a repaint. The
paint chips are bad. LOL, but I will love it all the same. Real
locomotives get repainted. It is a normal process. I would rather have the original paint, but these steamers are around 70 years
old and have been played with so all can not have original paint.
What I hate is touch ups. They always show. Either leave it alone or repaint all of it. Here is a pic of one that needs repainted.

IMG_0601.JPG
 

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I think the flat black or black satin would work. I am going to use Krylon paint.
It is good paint and can be found in Walmart. It has primer in it but I will use
straight primer first and then spray with Krylon.
 

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Here is my repainted one. It was painted with Krylon black satin.
Looks great. New cab numbers and lettering is dry rub transfers.
I did not paint this one. flyernut did. Tom, AmFlyer, said that
Krylon had a semi flat black paint that works well also. If you can find it.

IMG_0475.JPG



There is a hundred different blacks, just like there is 100 different whites.
 

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Krylon Satin Black is what I used for Al's 302, and this 290 I did years ago. I sand-blast the boiler shell, and use easy-off over cleaner or brake fluid on the thin tin tender shells. Sand-blasting will destroy the thin metal in seconds. I also use a self-etching primer on both shells. 017.JPG

018.JPG
 

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Krylon Satin Black is what I used for Al's 302, and this 290 I did years ago. I sand-blast the boiler shell, and use easy-off over cleaner or brake fluid on the thin tin tender shells. Sand-blasting will destroy the thin metal in seconds. I also use a self-etching primer on both shells. View attachment 514486

View attachment 514488
I agree, SAND blasting will destroy thin tinplate cars. So I use very extremely fine glass bead. It removes paint, rust etc. and leaves a paint friendly surface with only compressed air cleaning after the blasting.
I also OVEN dry my paint job. It allows the paint to flow and the heat opens the pores of the metal and allows for better adhesion. The paint also smooths out to a glass smooth finish.

Dan
 

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I agree, SAND blasting will destroy thin tinplate cars. So I use very extremely fine glass bead. It removes paint, rust etc. and leaves a paint friendly surface with only compressed air cleaning after the blasting.
I also OVEN dry my paint job. It allows the paint to flow and the heat opens the pores of the metal and allows for better adhesion. The paint also smooths out to a glass smooth finish.

Dan
Nice to know, and a beautiful job on that shell... I'm jealous!!!:smilie_daumenpos:
 

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thought about the oven, but did not know. What degree for oven? And how long.
Ah, baked on finish. LOL.
That red shell looks great.
 

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I have often thought about the oven trick too but didn't know what temp or for how long. That red sure does look great. I too do glass beading because it doesn't etch the metal but leaves it smooth. Self etching primer is all I use like flyernut said after the glass beading process. I can adjust the air pressure for softer metals to avoid damage.

Kenny
 

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I have no experience with a sand blaster. I have questions. Do you use a booth,
like a paint booth, how much do they cost, where do you get the medium like
glass beads. Pics would be helpful. Can the medium be used over again. My son
is a manager at a Harbor Freight Tool store. They have blasters and he could get
me a deal on one. And I have a couple air compressors. And a large air tank. I
guess I would need to get a regulator to adjust the air pressure. I can do up to
140 PSI. I would imagine that is too much.
 

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I have no experience with a sand blaster. I have questions. Do you use a booth,
like a paint booth, how much do they cost, where do you get the medium like
glass beads. Pics would be helpful. Can the medium be used over again. My son
is a manager at a Harbor Freight Tool store. They have blasters and he could get
me a deal on one. And I have a couple air compressors. And a large air tank. I
guess I would need to get a regulator to adjust the air pressure. I can do up to
140 PSI. I would imagine that is too much.
Mopac, Somebody I know just bought a blaster from Harbor Freight. Mine is a Snap-On that I've had for 20+ years. There really isn't much to them. Just a big metal cabinet with a door to open to put your parts in and close. A glass window is there so you can see what you are doing. There will be heavy rubber gloves to put your hands into to run the sprayer.
Yes the glass beads can be used over several times. Eventually it will be more dust than beads. But since we are talking small parts here the glass beads will last a while. I have a double cylinder air compressor since I used to do a lot of car parts and needed lots of air so I don't lose air pressure. A smaller compressor should be fine for what we are talking about. As to cost, Harbor Freight is your friend. Unless you are in the car restoration business like I was, you don't need a Snap-On. Very pricey. You will however need an air regulator in line. Yes 140 PSI is way too much.
My suggestion is to visit a Harbor Freight store and take a look first hand. There may be smaller sizes too. Mine is 4' x 3' and is free standing. Not something you would need. I have seen smaller ones but can't remember where. If I didn't already have the one I got, I would defiantly look for a smaller one. Handier for what we are using them for with train part. Check Micro Mark too. And no you can't paint in them since the beads are right there at the bottom of the cabinet.

Kenny
 

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I talked a little bit with my son. He said they had 2 blasters. One has the cabinet and
one he called for outdoors. He called it a hand held. No cabinet. I will have to look at them.
 

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Mopac a true sandblaster IS made to be used out doors since they are designed for actual sandblasting large objects as opposed to a cabinet blasting machine used for smaller pieces.
In practice you would use an outdoor sand blaster for sandblasting a car or other such large objects using sand as the blasting material.
Conversely, in an indoor blasting cabinet for smaller pieces you can use the glass beads or sand if you choose. The difference in the 2 blasting medias is just that sand will etch the surface and leave a not so smooth surface compared to glass beads. I prefer the finish the left by the glass beads. Some people, like flyernut, prefer the finished surface left by the sand. There is no set in stone method. Just a personal choice.
You can definitely feel the difference in the finished metal surface between the two. The smoothness of the glass beaded surface is why it is wise to use self etching primer too.

Kenny
 

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Al, 100lbs of pressure is what I use in my blaster. The one I use is much like the Harbor Freight jobs, both styles, the cabinet and the "outside" model. I had a Harbor Freight cabinet job, but gave it away eventually.. The "glass" window was actually plexi-glass, and with the sand particles flying all over inside of the cabinet, it scratched the bee-jeepers out of the window so bad, it was next to use-less..Also the rubber gloves wore out.. I've used "Black Diamond" blasting media as well as regular old play sand. I like the play sand as it's CHEAP, like me..The blasting material must be completely dry or it will clog up your lines. Also, I use a strainer to sift out larger particles of media that would other-wise clog up the lines. Be careful with the glass beads, as I've heard the glass bead dust is bad for your lungs. If I'm going to do alot of blasting such as wheels or parts from cars, I use a respirator.
 

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Al, 100lbs of pressure is what I use in my blaster. The one I use is much like the Harbor Freight jobs, both styles, the cabinet and the "outside" model. I had a Harbor Freight cabinet job, but gave it away eventually.. The "glass" window was actually plexi-glass, and with the sand particles flying all over inside of the cabinet, it scratched the bee-jeepers out of the window so bad, it was next to use-less..Also the rubber gloves wore out.. I've used "Black Diamond" blasting media as well as regular old play sand. I like the play sand as it's CHEAP, like me..The blasting material must be completely dry or it will clog up your lines. Also, I use a strainer to sift out larger particles of media that would other-wise clog up the lines. Be careful with the glass beads, as I've heard the glass bead dust is bad for your lungs. If I'm going to do alot of blasting such as wheels or parts from cars, I use a respirator.
Flyernut I have never seen a Harbor Freight blasting cabinet so I don't know about their construction. My Snap-On cabinet has a real glass window, not plexiglass, an exhaust fan, and catch bag so no breathing dust. I had several extra glasses cut from the original which are easily changed out when, just like plexiglass, they get cloudy from use. Just not as often. Two 60 watt lights in side the cabinet provide lighting. Never had one break in all my 20+ years, more like 30 as I think about it. Glass beads do not clog if you have a humid day. If you get a diminished amount of blasting media coming out because of blasted off paint chips or rust chips, simply put a gloved finger or similar solid object tightly over the nozzle and pull the trigger for a couple of short bursts which back flushes and clears the line. Yes a plain old house hold strainer also helps to run through the glass beads to collect foreign material once in a.

The original rubber gloves did wear out in about 2 years of constant daily use when I was into the car restoration business. Snap-On has replacements but I found a better pair at NAPA, cheaper and made heavier. Haven't changed them in I don't know how many years. Granted now days I don't do as much blasting as in the past but still at least once a week.
Maybe all the added features I mentioned, the exhaust fan, catch bag, and glass instead of plexiglass is part of the reason my Snap-On cost more compared to Harbor Freight.
Not to mention probably paying extra for the name. I know that Snap-On does have other models since I bought mine lo those many years ago.
I have used the Black Diamond as well in my cabinet with good results on cylinder heads, exhaust and intake manifolds.
All in all with all the thousands of dollars I have invested in tools, that cabinet is one of my better investments.

Now out door actual sandblasting does indeed require a respirator not to mention a head covering hood, coat and gloves. I spent may hours doing that to car bodies and even a couple of farm tractors.

So there you go mopac Al. More information on your choice.

Kenny
 

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LOL, the more you find out about something the more you realize you don't
know chit. Thanks for all the info guys. The snap on sounds nice but this is
something would use MAYBE Twice a year so I do not want to invest a ton.
Might just send my stuff to flyernut to do next summer. Right now all I need
blasted is a 290 shell.
 

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You are wise to consider your options since that Snap-On is a major investment. If I didn't already have it I probably wouldn't buy it now either. When I bought it, it was a necessity in my restoration work. Now not so much even though it seems that I am using it at least once a week to remove rust from something around the house or shop. Saves a lot of time using a wire brush and either a drill or die grinder. Friends who know I got it bring me things to clean up also.

Kenny
 

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LOL, the more you find out about something the more you realize you don't
know chit. Thanks for all the info guys. The snap on sounds nice but this is
something would use MAYBE Twice a year so I do not want to invest a ton.
Might just send my stuff to flyernut to do next summer. Right now all I need
blasted is a 290 shell.
Save up your blasting needs for next year, be glad to do it....
 
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