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Got a pretty good deal on a NIB (Blue Box) Proto 2000 E6A A-B-A set in Atlantic Coast Line's "simplified" black & yellow livery.

The Atlantic Coast Line's original paint scheme in the diesel era featured an exotic livery of Royal Purple trimmed with aluminum/silver and yellow touches. It was a stunning design credited to General Motors' legendary styling department which conceived many now-classic railroad liveries. Unfortunately for the ACL, which dealt with the Southeast's brutal sun the purple hue faded quickly. ... repaints were needed every two years just to keep the colors brilliant.

In what came down to simple economics, in 1957 under new president W. Thomas Rice the railroad changed to a simplified black design with accents of yellow and silver. It certainly was not as attractive but the company saved $100,000 annually by doing so.
So now I need to build a train. At the head end I'll have a Railway Express Agency reefer.

Would it have been prototypical to mix green Pullman-type heavyweights with the later silver "streamlined" cars in the passenger consist or would it have been one type or the other?

Would it make a difference if it was a "named" train/route?


Heavyweights
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Streamlined
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Mix away, I'm far from an expert on such things but when you look at old photos of passenger trains consists could be quite the mix of car eras/styles. Most of the old photos showing a perfectly matched train I suspect were more than likely promotional pics set up by the railroad itself.
 

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The railways treated their premier name trains as their golden cows.....CPR had the Canadian, starting in 1955, with all new stainless steel matching Budd cars, and ran them as sets for years, right up until VIA took over....but the older, lower level trains had a mix in them.....
 

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Would it make a difference if it was a "named" train/route?
Passenger train consists are highly specific to the railway or train. Best bet it to get details on specific ACL trains from ACL-specific historical and/or modeling groups.

Some trains like the "Canadian" or "California Zephyr" were promoted specifically as modern all-stainless-steel streamliners.

Other trains ran with any mix of available equipment.

Pullman cars wouldn't be on every train - certainly short-distance day-coach trains wouldn't have sleeper service. In some cases, railways may have provided their own sleeping cars, or used Pullman cars. In some cases, Pullman cars were painted in the colours of the railway they were assigned to, but had "Pullman" in the place of the railway's own name across the top of the car. (Pullman later ran lightweight sleeping car equipment as well, not just the older heavyweights.)

Best bet is to research and follow the examples of timetabled passenger trains on the specific RR you're modeling.
 

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I like all the same kind for whatever RR.
But I have seen pictures and read articles on the mixing the cars too.
I prefer to run all the same.
It's your RR do as you like. :)
 
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These two sites should provide you with a plethora of consideration:
Fallen Flag Railroad Photos (rr-fallenflags.org)
ACL & SAL Railroads Historical Society (aclsal.org)

You would generally be safe mixing car types in the 'non-varnish' categories, such as the X Limited. Top tier trains that were flag carriers for the brand would be the cleanest, the longest, the best maintained, and probably the most modern. Lower commuter types would be mix 'n match. But, the bottom line is that the schedule had to be maintained and people moved, and if that meant throwing a 1920's heavyweight in with a more modern Budd car to seat all paying passengers that run, that's what they put up.
 

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Wikipedia has pages on several ACL passenger trains, the couple I looked at talked about consists and equipment, I'd start there.
 

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ACL in conjunction with FEC, RF&P, and PRR ran streamliners from Both Coasts of Florida to New York. They were the East and West Coast Champions, and the Florida Special. Other trains, the Everglades, the Palmetto, The Havana Special and the seasonal Miamian were heavyweight, or mixed consist trains. Not only were the cars mixed, but the ownership of the cars,. depending on the route. ACL also participated in trains from the Mid West ranging fro the Streamlined South Wind and City of Miami to the Southland, Dixie Flyer and Seminole. They also ran to Wilmington NC and Augusta GA. That equals out to a whole bunch of modeling opportunities. Lots of information on the net and in books.
 
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