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Railroad Tycoon
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Great Bob, if I ever have one this is good reference.
Where did those diagrams in post #1 come from?

What locomotive did this the motor come out of?
Is this from the Bild a Motor ?
 

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Discussion Starter #7

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Bob,

BRAVO, once again. This is a wonderful info thread, and I believe the first time we've had such a detailed discussion of an old pendulum style reverse unit here on the forum. Your descriptions are incredibly clear, and most helpful to future tinkerers. Thank you for investing the time here!

A couple of questions:

So, it appears you've wired the e-unit with simple (conventional) wiring, rather than a re-do (or a repro) of the "printed circuit" wires. Are repro circuits available, by chance? What's inside one of those? Is it just wire and terminal ends laminated into pieces of cloth? Could one make something like that? (Cloth, varnish, etc.?)

In regards to ground lever ... perhaps adding a bit of weight to the "teeter totter" lever and/or tweaking its pivot fulcrum would yield a better and more reliable ground? Your thoughts here?

Again, many thanks!!!

TJ
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Bob,
A couple of questions:

So, it appears you've wired the e-unit with simple (conventional) wiring, rather than a re-do (or a repro) of the "printed circuit" wires. Are repro circuits available, by chance? What's inside one of those? Is it just wire and terminal ends laminated into pieces of cloth? Could one make something like that? (Cloth, varnish, etc.?)
The original connections are flat brass strips that follow the contours of my drawing (fourth picture - first post). You can see one of the strips poking up in the third picture where the cloth has frayed. Being flat they maintain their position relative to one another and of course they're sandwiched between two pieces of cloth for insulation.

I was thinking if they needed replacement that telephone wire might do run over the top so as not to interfere with the wheels. I just wired it temporarily to test the total operation.

In regards to ground lever ... perhaps adding a bit of weight to the "teeter totter" lever and/or tweaking its pivot fulcrum would yield a better and more reliable ground? Your thoughts here?
As received the lower contact was popped out of place,

Pendulum Reverse 011.JPG

Don't know how this occurred but it wouldn't work that way.
It has to swing freely though, and when the motor field is energized it swings to the disconnected position. That prevents the constant buzzing everyone is familiar with on the Ives type e-unit. Cleaning the pivots might help, it probably worked better when it was new. But testing shows it is 100% reliable when a jumper wire connects it directly to ground. A short piece of flexible wire can be soldered to the piece and the other end with an eye to the screw that holds it to the motor.

I'll post a picture when I mod it.
 

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But testing shows it is 100% reliable when a jumper wire connects it directly to ground.
Yeah, but doesn't that mean that the e-unit is always operational, i.e., you won't be able to disengage the e-unit and run always-forward?

Or am I misunderstanding the function here?

Just curious. This pendulum setup is most definitely new to me (and likely many others here), and I'm just trying to get my head around how it all works.

Thanks!

TJ
 

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Discussion Starter #12
The solenoid grounding contacts are shown below in both the closed and open position. Note that it is the silver arm on the bottom that actually moves. Normally it is held closed by gravity and completes the solenoid circuit. When the field winding of the motor is energized, its magnetism pulls that contact end down opening the solenoid circuit (no more buzzing).

PendulumReverse21.jpg

The lower of the two pictures shows the lower contact held open by the curved brass arm below it. This is the manual disconnect to allow the motor to continue in one direction only.

That lower arm is the piece that makes a poor ground. it only contacts the frame at its two pivot points. All I propose to do is solder a wire to that lower arm and attach it to the screw that assembles the reverse unit to the motor. It will still hang closed by gravity and open when the motor field is energized or it is propped open by the manual lever, but it will make a solid ground connection through the wire and not rely on the pivot point contacts.

Hop this helps.
 

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Ahhh!!!! Now I get it!!! Clever!

Thanks for the follow-through here, Bob.

I am learning TONS from this thread and your posted info!

Thank you!!!

Just a thought: When you solder a wire to the pivoting arm, use a relatively thin wire, and wrap it several turns in a coil ... between end attachment points. That will yield a very unstiff "spring", which, in turn, will impose little-to-no restraint to the natural pivot of the contact arm.

TJ
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Just a little note by way of followup. I was unhappy with my modification, not because it didn't work (it worked great), but because it was not a very elegant (cumbersome) solution and it involved replacing an original screw with a Philips head screw.

Phillips head screws were first used in automobiles during the early 1930s as a screw that could withstand the higher torque of automated assembly practices and would self center on the bit.

Just something to consider for any early 20th century restoration.
 

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Hey Bob,

I love the final solution. But, in thinking it through, do you think the pivoting pendulum bar SHOULD have rested on the frame cross-bar to begin with? I.e., perhaps Lionel intended that to happen, and somehow yours (as found) just got bent out of whack somewhere in its life?

Perhaps???

Great story ending!

TJ
 
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