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Discussion Starter #21 (Edited)
Tried a quicker way to build a pipe load. The pipe loads built previously took some time to construct and paint. I picked up a box of black straws off Amazon with no stripes or other decorations. I cut some strip wood, used a green marker to colour the wood, and the fine mini black elastics were used. The banding actually hold the loads together, no glue was used. It took less then 5 minutes to put together, and I don’t have to gingerly handle the loads. You could literally drop them, and there’s no damage....
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Discussion Starter #23
I used 2 Mcdonalds McFlurry spoons, that were cut to produce structural steel components, with two heavy wood skids and banding to complete the load. I love $1 projects....cheers
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Discussion Starter #24
I used styrene (sidewalk), which made it super simple to score and snap, no measuring required. This load was “rusted”. I’m going to keep my eye out for regular items that can be used as interesting flat car loads (I’ve already used McFlurry spoons). I have some combines and trucks that I’m going to work on as loads in the future. I’ve run out of flat cars, and now have an excuse to buy a couple more...cheers
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Discussion Starter #27
I had a Athearn switcher with a weak motor, and wasn’t going to invest time and money in rehabilitating this engine. I removed the trucks and motor, and built some heavy timber stilts. I’m going to weather lightly in the future, and add additional chains. I’ll update when done.
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Discussion Starter #31
I had a combine for the longest time, and finally got around to using it for its intended purpose. Careful separated the head from the tractor, and built skids to hold everything in place. I’m still debating whether to glue down everything and tie it down. I like the flexibility of using a flatcar for multiple loads...cheers
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After reading how a couple of folks suggested an odd number of pipes was best, I did an image search for flatcar pipe loads.....it turned out that even numbers of pipes were more common.....

The question is.....on the real flatcars, how is it determined in what format to stack them? Odd or even?
 

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Discussion Starter #34
I’m guessing, but I’m thinking it depends on how many the end user orders. I used a google search - pipe loads on flat cars, for my inspiration. The fun part of these projects is they are typically 1 day projects, and in the case of the black straws pipe load, is a 10 minute project. Even the combine load was under a hour, as I used a marker to colour the wood skids for the equipment. The yellow elastic banding is functional, as it really is holding the combine head to the pallet..cheers
 

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After reading how a couple of folks suggested an odd number of pipes was best, I did an image search for flatcar pipe loads.....it turned out that even numbers of pipes were more common.....

The question is.....on the real flatcars, how is it determined in what format to stack them? Odd or even?
The diameter of the pipe and how many fit inside inside the width of the car.
 

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Discussion Starter #36
I’ve been going through my locos in boxes, and putting in my display case. The Atlas locomotive comes in a black cradle, and before throwing it out, I was wondering if there was something I could do with it. I removed the ends, and some grinding made it a good base for a bridge. It has a good “structure” to it. The project took under a hour to make. The bridge ties are from Central Valley. I’ll get some finished photos in the next few days...I’m going to put this on a flatcar. I’ve seen some photos of bridge loads, so I’ll work on that as well.
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Discussion Starter #37
Sprayed it this morning. The rear Atlas locomotive holder is behind the bridge...cheers
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I used 2 Mcdonalds McFlurry spoons, that were cut to produce structural steel components, with two heavy wood skids and banding to complete the load. I love $1 projects....cheers
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I picked up a few of these spoons after snacks with my kids. I've got them cut down but not painted yet. I left them tapered and with the rim around the bottom. Really looks like something you'd see as a decorative structural part for a bridge or outdoor archway. I'm thinking of a gloss blue for color.

Thanks for the great idea, I'll put up pics when they're finished.
 
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