Model Train Forum banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
280 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
What do you apply to this after it dries to fill in the holes?
I've used drywall plaster but it seems to crack with time.
I've used vinyl caulking which held nicely but the $ adds up when I did a big area. I applied it with a wet brush to spread it out more and the results were good, no cracking.
I'm starting over and am wondering if anyone has another idea??
I'm seeing vinyl spackling at Lowe's for $17 a gallon. This might be the answer, spreads nice and won't crack.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,149 Posts
Back when I used it, I would mix up a batch of plaster and paint it on top of the cloth.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,552 Posts
What do you apply to this after it dries to fill in the holes?
I've used drywall plaster but it seems to crack with time.
I've used vinyl caulking which held nicely but the $ adds up when I did a big area. I applied it with a wet brush to spread it out more and the results were good, no cracking.
I'm starting over and am wondering if anyone has another idea??
I'm seeing vinyl spackling at Lowe's for $17 a gallon. This might be the answer, spreads nice and won't crack.
I have used hydrocal and have never had a problem.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,716 Posts
That is the technique I use too. When I started using it I wasn't working it enough, but if you do, those holes will be filled in, but you should put on a second coat of the plaster cloth anyway. It's not very strong as a single sheet if it is not over a harder substrate.

Some of mine is over rigid cardboard and some of it was applied over polyester batting. The batting obviously is not a rigid material so you will want to use multiple layers of the cloth.

Like Lehigh74 says, work it with your wet fingertips until the holes are filled.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
658 Posts
What Michael & Lehigh said. Layer it, work it, smooth it.

I went with dirt colored latex paint where there would be greenery.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,637 Posts
I always used it at least two-ply for strength, and that tended to cover any through-holes. So, what was left was a dimpled surface that I would cover with fine ground foam, always at least two colours, and also added some coarser flocking over that. It's more costly this way, but the results are better and more durable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,512 Posts
I use vinyl caulking or spackling paste, either diluted by using a very wet brush. No cracking. Often I let it dry fro about ten minutes and they use a wet sponge or folded paper towel to smooth its surface a bit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,253 Posts
I've experimented with dipping paper towels in very thin Plaster of Paris solution. Carefully spread them over the area and paint on more POP with a brush. It was very rigid when it dried, and I saw no cracks. Cheaper than plaster cloth!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
280 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
I use vinyl caulking or spackling paste, either diluted by using a very wet brush. No cracking. Often I let it dry fro about ten minutes and they use a wet sponge or folded paper towel to smooth its surface a bit.
Yes, this is what I did before. I like the vinyl because it spreads easily with a wet brush and dries firm and takes paint well. Thanks for all the ideas.:thumbsup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,232 Posts
I am poor. I use paper towels covered with a very thin and goopy mixture of drywall compound (spackle). No voids or pits left behind.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
280 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
And the Winner is:

Dap Vinyl Spackling

Got a gallon for $17 at Lowes. Got a lot done but need a little more.

It dries nice and hard on the plaster cloth and just spreads on with a paint brush. Easy to paint and won't crack.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
488 Posts
I have used drywall seam sealer with excellent results. Also Woodland Scenics Sculptamold and have never had cracking. I over lapped the covering on the first layer then another single layer, then add the coating. Regarding the drywall seam sealer, it can be thinned with a LITTLE water too. Don't add too much water.
I forgot to mention that I use paper towels dipped in a very thin plaster mixture. Way back when I bought the Woodland Scenics plaster cloth. I soon learned that stuff doesn't go far on a large layout so I tried the paper towel and thinned plaster method. Much cheaper and it seems stronger.
By the way, you can add clothing dye to the water that you thin the mixture with for a nice effect. If you use a brown or a medium to dark green dye, ground cover becomes much easier. You can paint highlights on the dyed areas then add your ground cover.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,149 Posts
Also Woodland Scenics Sculptamold ....
Woodland Scenics doesn't sell Sculptamold. Theirs is lightweight hydrocal casting plaster or sculpting plaster. These products are OK, but for me, Sculptamold is the ultimate scenery material. Not as porous as plaster, but much sturdier and less exacting in the mixing proportions.

Sculptamold is a product of the American Art Clay Company, or AMACO. I buy it off Amazon in 25-pound bags.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
318 Posts
I am poor. I use paper towels covered with a very thin and goopy mixture of drywall compound (spackle). No voids or pits left behind.
Yeah. I never understood why everyone doesn't do that instead of the high priced version of basically the same thing.
Though I'm armchairing a long time now, when I do make hills, mountains I still use screen stapled to risers covered with plaster or spackle..Old old school but it works great..And 'dirt' cheap.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top