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Yard Master & Research
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Tender

Advice, I don't own one. Here is a picture but I think it is identical to the 2046W It was with a variety of engines. THe 2035 Pacific shows the picture of the tender at the bottom link.Price wise it is what the markets bears. Most commonly they are overpriced that is why they are still for sale,in my opinion.
I am not into rating either. The TCA is into collecting for value. You can get guide books but I find that they can be misleading. Post war prices seem to be stable enough.
What is your question? IF you ask I can send you to a better link.
 

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I use S scale post war American Flyer. Depending on what your question is, I may or may not be able to help.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thank you both. Anyway its more of a technical question. Im working on a 2025 locomotive and its tender (6466w), Im into postwar for collecting and also operating, mainly operating so I look for "junk" and work on it to try and make it run. This is the first project engine Im taking on. The reason you dont know how to do it unless you do it yourself. Ive replaced the wire going from the trucks to the whistle itself and it works to a degree. The motor creates alot of heat and Im triyng to figure out what might be creating it. Im open for suggestions and again this is the 1st engine im working on myself
 

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prr1361...welcome to the club. I'm running similar (American Flyer) postwar trains, and I'm also a novice. My first suggestion, though, is to do some internet research---there is a wealth of information on sites like this one, and on sites that sell parts. It's their business to make you feel confident to repair your own, so let them teach you. I'd start here: http://www.hobbysurplus.com/americanflyerlocodiagrams.asp#steam type info
Drop down the blue column on the left and follow Lionel.
Heat (the guys on this site teach you everything!) either suggests an electrical problem or a need for cleaning and lubrication; I'd start with the clean-and-lube. Your stuff is similar technology to mine; if I can figure it out, it can't be very complicated. Open her up and carefully clean the dust out with a soft toothbrush, q-tips, soft paintbrush....get all the garbage out. Places of electrical contact can be gently cleaned with a pencil eraser to get the carbon out and improve the connections. Gears get grease: everyone here seems to agree on the white lithium stuff you can find in small tubes at Walmart. There are separate opinions on oil---I use 3-in-1 sewing machine oil. Guideline is that gears get grease, bearing surfaces get oil. Don't flood it---just lube it. Oil the rolling surfaces on your axles.
If you open the engine up to get at your armature, be careful not to drop the brushes and springs. In my trains, the brushes are metal cylinders with springs behind them, mounted in brass tubes under the engine cab (wiring runs to them). They fall out and roll away, so you might want to work over a sheet pan. Also, use the rubber eraser on the metal wheels that pick up your current---you may need something coarser, but I'd start with the eraser. Best of luck, and show off your work with some pics on this site!
 

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Yard Master & Research
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so I look for "junk" and work on it to try and make it run.
Boy did you come to the right place!
Heat on motors, I assume you are referring to the whistle motor. You need to clean the area around the brushplate. The carbon buildup is shorting out the connection and creating heat. Especially clean the armature plate the grooves between the three plates keep them insulated.
The brushplate could be worn, this would make the fields rub against the sides as they spin.
Your windings could be breaking down with age too.
Welcome and stay awhile. I recommend a service manual if you do not already have one. Nice find Reeckers
 

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Thank you, T-Man. We have a saying in the south: "Even a blind pig will find the occasional acorn." :D
 

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Discussion Starter #9
thank you all for the advice. See i figured I came to the right place. Anyway not sure of the average age on here. But Im 25 and Ive always been into trains. As i said Im looking to start repairing postwar items. With the 2025
being the first one. Couple reasons for this. 1 Im not sure how long the guys that do the work are going to be around ( in the hobby and in general) 2 It passes time here at home. So im sure questions will be asked thanks again
 

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Yard Master & Research
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Small World

I checked and surprisingly enough the 6466w is the only whistle tender I have. It came with a 2018 Prairie.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
T-man

Thats the tender, it was also numbered 2466w in earlier years though I dont know exactly what years. Thanks for the pics. Anyway just throwing this out there. Is there a way to get the brush plate off without damaging it or the armature. After getting the advice from yins guys further investigation revealed that I definately have a carbon build up between the two. I feel like a new guy on the job, so as I make progress with this, I will have questions, and hopefully itll get easier when i get my next project.
 

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Since you asked I will get some pics. The plate should come off with two screws. This picture is from a Scout. The area of the black lines needs to be cleaned. That is where the short occurs with carbon. This shows the three contacts for the windings of the armature. The plate is the item that holds the brushes.

I used a 320 or 400 to clean up the grooves. After 40 years this usually helps.
 
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