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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I poured some Enviro Tex today, my first adventure with this product. Satisfied for the most part. I had mixed in some coloring, but didn't quite get the effect I wanted. The coloring looked fine in the container before pouring but ended up a bit too transparent after the pour. I guess it's all hit and miss. I'll give it a few days to cure. I still have enough left over for a thin layer, so I will mix up the remainder and try to darken it a bit more with another layer. And hope that I don't end up screwing the whole thing up. Unless someone here can tell me that this is not a good idea?

20210328_144913.jpg 20210328_144847.jpg 20210328_140748.jpg
 

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I think it looks great right there. I wouldn't change a thing, regardless of the effect you were going for.

I think putting a darker tinted layer over that layer, unless you make it completely opaque, is probably not going to look right. Turbidity increases with depth, not vice versa. If you're going to try, test it on a very small, out of sight section first.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I think it looks great right there. I wouldn't change a thing, regardless of the effect you were going for.

I think putting a darker tinted layer over that layer, unless you make it completely opaque, is probably not going to look right. Turbidity increases with depth, not vice versa. If you're going to try, test it on a very small, out of sight section first.
Thanks for your reply. This is why I asked the question. Because my first instinct was to just pour another layer (darker) over top, but I've learned over time to be more cautious. I was hoping someone would come up with a reason not to pour another layer. That way I could weigh the pros and cons. I have been looking at it for two days now, and I could live with it. (going for the dictionary....let me see....turbidity:...)
 

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Sorry... that's the boy scout in me talking. Turbidity describes the clarity of water due to sediment or organic material.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I think I like this book better than the paint/modge podge approach.
Well, speaking of Mod Podge, I did see a Youtube video with a technique with clear gloss Mod Podge dabbed on in areas, and shaped a bit by gently using an airbrush to give the look of small ripples or swirling. I have to be careful not to go too overboard. I have some "people" coming. Fishermen, canoeists, and such. I will wait until they arrive and are arranged around the scene. Then I will decide if I should use that technique, or just let it be. Thanks for your comment.
 

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Yes that does work. I saw similar and tried it on some blank pieces of 1 x 1 plywood I have laying around. I actually couldn't quite nail the base colors to my liking but it certainly worked. I also tried adding a little 3D effect with the paper towels/toilet paper and glue first -- this also does work. I believe these ideas have been taking from art, like oils where folks build things up to make them stand out.

anyway -- you start with the base paint of the underlying water and a lot of folks seem to stick with 4 colors and paint that around, light to dark say and some swirls. if you do the TP, you do that first though with a lot of water glue and let that dry completely -- then the paint.

then you layer on either high gloss varnish that's water based or the modge podge and you just do layer after layer -- i typically did just 2 or 3 but you do get a water effect -- there's no doubt about it.

It is easy and the components are cheap and all that -- of course some looks better than others but even mine looked ok. I certainly could go with it.

But overall having said all that, I think I prefer that deeper water look ... which I have no tried yet.
 

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Well, speaking of Mod Podge, I did see a Youtube video with a technique with clear gloss Mod Podge dabbed on in areas, and shaped a bit by gently using an airbrush to give the look of small ripples or swirling. I have to be careful not to go too overboard. I have some "people" coming. Fishermen, canoeists, and such. I will wait until they arrive and are arranged around the scene. Then I will decide if I should use that technique, or just let it be. Thanks for your comment.
Yeah, that works. So does artists acrylic gloss gel (or Woodland Scenics Water Effects -- same stuff, costs more). This is thick enough you can just dabble it on with a paint brush; no fancy airbrush technique required.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Severn and CTValley, thanks for the input regarding water effect technique. The one thing that I don't want to do, is to interfere with the look of depth. I wanted the water to be transparent, yet tinted just enough to look a little less like it just came out of your kitchen faucet. So as I was thinking in my original post, I am considering adding another thin layer of resin, tinted a little darker. The danger there...if I overdo it with the tint I will lose the transparency that I want and there is no going back after pouring. I'm thinking the mod podge thing might be the better idea if not overdone. Just a little "movement" effect in strategic areas without losing the depth look. If you look at the photos you will notice a small patch of green near the bottom of the photo that looks out of place. That's because I tried to touch up a spot and didn't get the green shade right. I thought I would be okay when pouring the tinted resin. Thought that would help conceal this error, and of course it didn't. Another thing I don't want to do is raise the water level much higher either because of the girder bridge, and I will be building a vehicle bridge where you see that bare roadway. Decisions! I think there may be a real good argument for leaving it as it is...LOL.
 

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I like it, too. I think you could go either way. The turbidity will give the effect of movement, and right now the water looks still.
Knowing me I would do both.. add more of the rain and then do the mod podge.

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Well, speaking of Mod Podge, I did see a Youtube video with a technique with clear gloss Mod Podge dabbed on in areas, and shaped a bit by gently using an airbrush to give the look of small ripples or swirling. I have to be careful not to go too overboard. I have some "people" coming. Fishermen, canoeists, and such. I will wait until they arrive and are arranged around the scene. Then I will decide if I should use that technique, or just let it be. Thanks for your comment.
I use Mod Podge. I make any waves or ripples first with wood filler shaped into wave patterns. Next a blue/green paint, and then clear gloss Mod Podge.

Traction Fan 🙂
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I use Mod Podge. I make any waves or ripples first with wood filler shaped into wave patterns. Next a blue/green paint, and then clear gloss Mod Podge.

Traction Fan 🙂
I don't want to make any waves, but....(pun intended). Those waves look real good! Waves would be out of place in my case, though. I'm not looking for turbulence. I was just mainly concerned with trying to make my water look a little darker, while still remaining transparent. I'm starting to get used to the way it is now, and I think just a little Mod Podge dabbled on in some places, around rocks for example, would give a bit of swirling motion to a river that right now looks like a great place to lace up your skates, grab a stick and a puck.
 

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I don't want to make any waves, but....(pun intended). Those waves look real good! Waves would be out of place in my case, though. I'm not looking for turbulence. I was just mainly concerned with trying to make my water look a little darker, while still remaining transparent. I'm starting to get used to the way it is now, and I think just a little Mod Podge dabbled on in some places, around rocks for example, would give a bit of swirling motion to a river that right now looks like a great place to lace up your skates, grab a stick and a puck.
Mod Podge is somewhat inclined to level itself . The waves, & boat wake effects, Etc. in my photos are not formed in Mod Podge. The Mod Podge is just a shiny coat put on after the "ocean bottom" is made., complete with wave shapes, from wood filler (or plaster) then the paint for color, and only last, the Mod Podge just for shine. You might have better luck making ripples around rocks with a bit of RTV clear sealant. I just dry brush some white model pain across the wave tops.

Good work;
Traction Fan
 

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I watched several (many!) vids on water effects -- in particular the bottom paint technique, then layers of something shiny -- possibly texturing that that to create the water effect. Modge Podge and water based glosses, even white glue that dries clear. The effect is best with layers of these materials. More layers, more effect. The waves and all that can be built up in a variety of ways -- at least by the vids. The only one I tried which worked was white glue soaked tp (paint, layers of glose/modge, etc...). The biggest problem I had was the paint -- the effect is enhanced with good color choice, blending but also not blending to create the swirl of water but also some color based depth. I felt I didn't do so great with that part.

For water where maybe you'd want to see more deeply into it -- I don't see any other way but the clear pour based products.
 

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Here's one guy I really like, giving a mostly water material. He uses the toilet paper, paint and gloss approach with some highlights of something like white caulk.


There's another one in his vid pike that's similar.

But there's another one I'm thinking of that I saw which used paint and modge podge... Really great looking. I'll see if I can dig that up also.
 

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I hope his seaport water shown on the thumbnail is wet and will cure to a more clear appearance. As it looks now, it's way too white.
 

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I'm jumping in here for information. Getting ready to do a somewhat large water scene and will need rapids and ripples. Woodland scenics system sounds good, but no actual experience and it's expensive for a large scene.

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I'm jumping in here for information. Getting ready to do a somewhat large water scene and will need rapids and ripples. Woodland scenics system sounds good, but no actual experience and it's expensive for a large scene.

Sent from my SM-G781U using Tapatalk
vette_kid;

There are much cheaper, and equally impressive, ways to make model "water" than by using the very expensive Woodland Scenics stuff.
I use Mod Podge. A jar big enough to cover a large N-scale lake, and then some, costs $3 at Walmart. Its in their craft section. There are two different types of Mod Podge. "Gloss", which is what you'll need, and "flat", which you don't.
I'm not sure if Walmart even carries the flat version, but I know they have the gloss, since that's where I bought mine.

Mod Podge only provides the high gloss finishing layer that makes model water look "wet." The ripples, and the color of the water, are installed before the Mod Podge goes on. I used a mixture of green, and blue, Tamiya model paint for my water. However, just about any paint will do. While your in Walmart's craft dept. you might want to pick up some medium-dark shades of blue and green craft paint.

For waves, ripples, boat wakes, etc. I use Elmer's wood filler to form them before painting the water color on. The white water effects, like the breaking waves and boat wakes in the photos were made this way. You could also use plaster, or RTV silicone sealant, for the ripples. Essentially, you are modeling only the shape of the water before painting. You can make it any shape you want. Then the paint goes on, and finally the Mod Podge.

One possible disadvantage of this method is that the "water" is very thin. For still water, like a pond, the water is only two coats of paint thick. (one being Mod Podge) It is possible to show semi-submerged objects like tree branches, rocks, & trash, but they won't actually be submerged completely as they would when using Enviro-Tex, like the OP. That's an epoxy casting resin, and you can pour it on in much thicker batches than paint & Mod Podge. While it is possible to add more layers of Mod Podge, it will never be as thick as casting resin.
Going back a bit in this thread, I see the same photos I was going to add here are already attached to one of my earlier responses. Please check those out if you want to see what paint & Mod Podge "water" looks like.

Good Luck & Have Fun;

Traction Fan 🙂
 
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