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I have a standard starter train kit. HO set 4 foot oval. I want to add numerous straight pieces so the train will cover a 10' x 10' room. Will the power supply that came with my starter kit power the train on this size track? Is there and easy way to determine the length of track that a power supply can be used with?

Thanks.
 

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As long as you are only running the one locomotive that came with the set then your power pack will handle it. What you will find is that you lose power (voltage drop) the farther your engine gets from the power pack. The connections in the track don't conduct all that well. Most people add feeders to the track at various points around a large layout. The wire carries the voltage with less resistance (less voltage drop) than track does.

If you want to stay with snap track, get a few extra terminal tracks and add wire jumpers spaced around the track. Just make sure you don't cross the polarity or you will damage the power pack.
 

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feeder is the wire that feeds the power to your rail. you can have as many feeders as you'd like. the point is to deliver power to where its needed and avoid dropping voltage due to rail resistance and imperfect electrical connection with rail joiners.

track is not an electrical consumer and as such the length of it is negligible (as long as properly wired)
 

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Tiger14, there's nothing wrong with being a novice---welcome to the forum. Your track forms an electric circuit: two wires run from the transformer, one to each rail. If your engine is sitting on the track the wires connect to, the wheels pick up the current, transfers it to the motor, and off it goes, right? Except that the further it gets from the transformer, the greater the resistance to the flow of electricity---the rails and pins have resistance, and imperfect connections make it worse. It gets so far and slows or quits on you.
To ovecome it, you run an additional hot wire or hot and ground wires from the transformer posts to the dead zone or the opposite side of the track, wherever the problem is. Make sure you don't accidentally cross-wire your rails; the wires have to follow the original pattern of transformer post "A" to the first rail, and post "B" to the second rail. That additional wire is called a feeder, and has less resistance than the track. You can buy clips that match your track and use them to connect directly to the rail, or get gung-ho and solder them to the outer side of the rail(s).
 
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