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I am going to use 36" Atlas flex track with a cork bed for my HO setup. I have never used flex track before.

How do I get the power (i.e. wiring) to the 36" flex track? Do I use a shorter insert piece of track with the connection device?

Please post a link or picture.

Thanks
 

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Soldering power leads is the way to go.

Nice video, Tap ... good tip using wet cotton balls to avoid melting ties.

TJ
 

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I also enjoyed the video, found it helpful.

But why is soldering the way to go? I have one of these Atlas tracks with a plastic attachment on the side where I screw my wires in. It seems to work.

Also, soldering two rails together where they join, is this for stability or to improve the electrical contact? :confused:
 

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I also enjoyed the video, found it helpful.

But why is soldering the way to go? I have one of these Atlas tracks with a plastic attachment on the side where I screw my wires in. It seems to work.
when you look at real railroad do you ever see track with plastic attachments on a side? exactly :)
 

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I also enjoyed the video, found it helpful.

But why is soldering the way to go? I have one of these Atlas tracks with a plastic attachment on the side where I screw my wires in. It seems to work.

Also, soldering two rails together where they join, is this for stability or to improve the electrical contact? :confused:
Soldering the wires allows you to place a lead wherever it is needed. If you have a block that is one large loop of a non-standard radius you do not need to fudge the curve to fit a terminal track in. Also t does not require a joiner to power a track. I prefer to place the leads in the middle of each block.

The reason fo soldering the rails at the joints is two fold. First it is for connectivity. The joiners over time can loosen up and cause poor connections. This is especially true in turns and elevated sections. The solider will fill any gaps and make the rail simmular to a solid wire. The second is for durability. As stated in the first reason the joiners can wear and become loose over time. Even if the track is nailed/glued down a loose joint can cause a car to jump track.

I prefer to lay all of my track first using joiners and solder all of the leads. With the track tacked down I run trains for a week. Durring this time I correct the areas that I do not like layout wise while the track is not soldered and easy to change. Then after the first week I choose the blocks that are working the best and solder those. From that point of the next few days of running trains I solder a block here and there as I feel all the issues are worked out. This does a few things for me, 1. I feel I am accomplishing something on the build, 2. I can look at the trains run and enjoy my work without waiting to the end (helps me stay patient), 3. Allows issues to be worked out while track pieces can easily be swapped.
 

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I've got a power question (although I am not sure if I am posting this in the right place)... First of all, to let you know, I am completely new to model railroading... I've just recently purchased a new LGB starter set (along with some additional track, etc.) to get going. Along with my new set, I purchased an LGB 1031 bumper to attach to one end of a section of my track. The bumper comes with a light. My question is, how in the heck do you attach the wires to the track to power the light? The light has two wires with a type of end connector that I can't seem to figure out where to "plug" them into. Any help would be appreciated.

Thanks,
Brian
 

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Have you checked through the LGB accessories to see if they have an attachment that clips to the rails? I know Lionel has clip on to use for power.
 

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I've got a power question (although I am not sure if I am posting this in the right place)... First of all, to let you know, I am completely new to model railroading... I've just recently purchased a new LGB starter set (along with some additional track, etc.) to get going. Along with my new set, I purchased an LGB 1031 bumper to attach to one end of a section of my track. The bumper comes with a light. My question is, how in the heck do you attach the wires to the track to power the light? The light has two wires with a type of end connector that I can't seem to figure out where to "plug" them into. Any help would be appreciated.

Thanks,
Brian
I don't run your type of train, but is it possible the leads plug directly into the ends of your rails?
 
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