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Is there a short? or just nothing? If a short, the same rail is connected to both sides of the distribution block. If nothing, check the connectivity between the input and terminals and input power.

Paul
 

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What Paul said. Post a pic of what you're trying to do. Are you sure you have all the wires in the correct polarity?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Nothing

I am getting nothing. I will check it again and see what happens. Being a novice, it is easy to get frustrated.
 

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That website describes the board as a way to power all the lighting on a layout.....no mention of powering the track.....:confused:
 

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Disconnect the terminal board and connect power directly to the track (use test leads with alligator clips). Do you have power now? If not, the problem is in your power pack or bus connections. If so, then the board may be faulty. Or you have the same rail connect to both sides of the board somewhere.
 

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there isn't really anything to go wrong with the board, and it's limits of 30V / 6/8 A are within the limits for your track ...
only thing is power -should- come in the two large red / black plugs, not the small DC/AC adapter fitting, judging by the trace width
 

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Check the items that the others have mentioned. Specifically, if you have polarity crossed in your feeders.

Are you using the EZ track feeder sections in multiple locations? If these are similar to other roadbed track, like Kato, then it is important to have all the feeders sections oriented the same way.
There’s a plug or wire run coming out of them. In general, all the plugs/wires have to be coming out on the same side of the tracks, either on the inside or outside.
The direction doesn’t matter, as long as they are all the same.
A short will occur if one is reversed.
 

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A lot depends on what you have on hand to check things out with, and how far back in the food chain you want to go. For example an option (as a place to start) would be to ensure the DC power supply transformer works by plugging it in to the wall, and using a voltmeter to see that the track outputs have an appropriate voltage on them. And work your way from there. Have you done something like that?
 

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You have a very neat power distribution strip.

It seems to be a very simple device. Connect
the line from your DCC controller or DC power
pack track terminals to the Red and Black
terminals on the strip. Set the speed control
to a mid point.

+

Then use your multimeter set to AC if you
have DCC - or - set to DC if you are analog.

Put one probe on the first left screw, the other
on the first right screw.

You should get a voltage reading of 6 or 7 to 15.
If you do, go to next pair of screws.

Voltage readings do indicate the terminal
strip and power source are working.

If you don't get any voltage readings on any
of the screws there is a problem with the terminal
strip.

+

You next should connect wires to the first
two screws and check for voltage. If present
connect the loose end to the track terminals.

If you are not getting voltage on the track rails
there is a problem with the track terminals
it would seem.

Don
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I have attached a picture of the board and transformer. I hooked the power input under the top thumb screw. Should I have tried to connect it to where the little metal protrusions are?
 

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Well, it's certainly RED!

I'd start by removing all the RED wires, and connect one set of RED wires at a time.

It may also be helpful to take a sharpie and color one wire on each RED feeder to black. Be sure that one lines up to a similar side of the connector going to the track, also marked black.

That will help you be sure all the RED sides go to one side of the track, and BLACK to the other side.

ADDED: Ignore the sarcasm. You just need to be sure you have one side (red) and the other side (black) connected to the same side of the track, else you'll have a short, and it no workie. (I mean, all the red to one side and all the black to the other)

Should I have tried to connect it to where the little metal protrusions are?
No, where you connected is fine.
 

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Yeah, I would definitely do something to color-code those wires. Ideally, you'd remove all the red wires from the side with the black terminal post and replace them with another color. Realizing that this would probably be way too much work, maybe get a roll of electrical or duct tape in a different color and wrap the ends.

Everything coming from the right side (with red terminal / red wires) should go to the same rail of your track. Left or right doesn't matter, as long as you're consistent. Wires from the left side (black terminal, newly color coded wires) should hook to the OTHER rail.
 

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The only problem with making some not red is that next time it's set up, some not reds might need to connect on the red side. Definitely make sure all the wire connected to the black post side go to the same rail and the same with the red post.

Where the supply wires are connected is metal right? I can't tell from the photo.
Paul
 

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The only problem with making some not red is that next time it's set up, some not reds might need to connect on the red side. Definitely make sure all the wire connected to the black post side go to the same rail and the same with the red post.

Where the supply wires are connected is metal right? I can't tell from the photo.
Paul
Not sure I follow that logic. One side of that power distribution block is ALWAYS going to power ONE of the rails. The other rail will be powered from the OTHER side of that block. Feeders will be connected in pairs, one to the red side, and one to the black. Using different colored wires for each side is a quick and easy way to ensure you don't get the polarity backwards and cause a short.

If you have four terminal tracks, then you're ALWAYS going to have 4 wires on each side. So you have 4 red wires and 4 not red ones. Each time you set it up, no matter where those terminal tracks are, your wiring will hook up like that. So you just always use the 4 red wires on that side and the 4 not red wires on the black side.

And yes, the terminals are metal, with a plastic screw cap to lock down the wires. The little metal tabs are for soldering wires in place, and could be safely removed (they probably just slip on over the terminal lugs).
 

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I agree. Having one side black and connecting it consistently shouldn't matter. Unless I misunderstand.

But having the wires color coded and connected the same way for either DC or DCC shouldn't cause any problems down the road, and in this case the wires MUST be connected the same way, else it won't work.

ADDED: DCC doesn't care if the wires are connect 'left or right', but you must have all the left on the left, and all the right on the right.
 
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