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Discussion Starter #1
Here's a short tutorial about re-quartering a 4-6-2 loco such as a K5 Pacific, Hudson, Silver Streak, Royal Blue,etc. It's a somewhat easy way to "get her done". I'm using a chassis I have in my parts bin, and the actual quartering will be shown on it. However I won't be pressing the wheels onto the axles.
First, check to see if the quartering is indeed off. What I do is to remove all linkage and then replace the connecting rod on one side, and then turn the chassis over and check the opposite side. The opposing wheels should be 90 degrees from the other side.For example if the wheel holes are at the 6 o'clock position, the opposing side should be at 3 o'clock or 6 o'clock. The exact degree is 88 but 90 works fine. If the opposing side is just a little off, re-quartering is needed. Here's some pictures.
 

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Put all your wheels on the axles but don't press them on yet. Place your connecting rod on the wheels and using the large 4-40 nut commonly used on the brass stud, screw the connecting rod onto the 3 wheels, and tightening the 2 nuts so the 3 wheel set does not move. 003.JPG

004.JPG
 

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Flip the chassis over and do the same thing. When you have all 3 wheels in the correct location, use the large 4-40 hex bolts and screw the connecting rod onto the wheel set. You're checking for correct placement of the wheels. If everything looks good, remove the connecting rod and putting the chassis in a vise, compress the 2 6 wheel sets until you get the proper gauging. Check for correct re-quartering by installing the connecting and make sure it fits. On the original side we started with, remove the hex nuts and replace with the correct shoulder nuts, and then do the same thing thing for side #2. Once you get both sides together, roll the chassis around. It should roll smooth as silk; if it doesn't, your re-quartering is still off and repeat the process. This is where you should have a wheel puller, it makes the process alot easier. If anyone gets stumped, ask a question.. If you're still stumped, send it to me and I'll do the quartering for you, absolutely free of charge, just pay shipping....Loren[/ATTACH]
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Here are my basic quartering jigs and wheel puller, both made by a good friend of mine. I also have the Atlantic jig, made by him too. The 2 flat stock pieces shown are wheel gauging gauges. You attach these plate to the underside of the chassi and press the wheel sets on. When the wheels hit the flat stock, the wheels are properly gauged and no more pressing needed or desired. 006.JPG

007.JPG
 

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Thanks for the tutorial flyernut.

That chassis in first pic looks familiar.

We need your tutorials to be a sticky, maybe John can sticky this one.
 

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Interesting that the 88 deg vs 90 deg seems to be visible to the naked eye looking at the two jigs. I didn't think it would be so apparent. Unless my eyes are lying, of course. Really nice to have machinist friend, they can do wonderful things.
 

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Interesting that the 88 deg vs 90 deg seems to be visible to the naked eye looking at the two jigs. I didn't think it would be so apparent. Unless my eyes are lying, of course. Really nice to have machinist friend, they can do wonderful things.
He's a great friend in more ways than one.:smilie_daumenpos:
 

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Whats the chance of eyeballing wheels for quartering. There are just so many spines
on the axles. I know a jig would be better and easier.

flyernut, that lower armature bushing in that chassis with the slots. I thought someone cut those in. Not so. I saw some for sale on ebay just like that one. Seller said they were early bushings. It s a factory bushing. You might have seen them before, I hadn't.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Whats the chance of eyeballing wheels for quartering. There are just so many spines
on the axles. I know a jig would be better and easier.

flyernut, that lower armature bushing in that chassis with the slots. I thought someone cut those in. Not so. I saw some for sale on ebay just like that one. Seller said they were early bushings. It s a factory bushing. You might have seen them before, I hadn't.
Yep, early factory...
 

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Those 1948 302s I got from you might have the slotted bushings. I have not had to take them apart. They run too good to mess with.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Whats the chance of eyeballing wheels for quartering. There are just so many spines
on the axles. I know a jig would be better and easier.

flyernut, that lower armature bushing in that chassis with the slots. I thought someone cut those in. Not so. I saw some for sale on ebay just like that one. Seller said they were early bushings. It s a factory bushing. You might have seen them before, I hadn't.
Using the connecting gear is more or less eye-balling..
 

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You got a sticky guys.
 

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I'm sorry this post is a little late, but I'm an "O" person who only visits the "S" area on this forum occasionally. This topic caught my eye because I've seen it before in other scales. So, I have a couple of questions and a favor to ask.

First, does the degree difference (88 v 90) between the eyeball method and the jig method become more important as the scale changes, either higher or lower? Second, does it make any difference (in any scale) which side of the engine (engineer or fireman) has the wheel set ahead on the clock (engineer at 9:00 and fireman at either 6:00 or 3:00) or is that just a variation by prototype or by valve gear equipment?

Finally, the favor to ask: Would flyernut please be able to provide pictures of both the quartering jig and the wheel puller in use? Perhaps with multiple views (top, side, bottom)? I personally learn much better with pictures than I do with words.

Thanks and Happy New Year (off to another party at my sister's place soon),
Chuck
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I'm sorry this post is a little late, but I'm an "O" person who only visits the "S" area on this forum occasionally. This topic caught my eye because I've seen it before in other scales. So, I have a couple of questions and a favor to ask.

First, does the degree difference (88 v 90) between the eyeball method and the jig method become more important as the scale changes, either higher or lower? Second, does it make any difference (in any scale) which side of the engine (engineer or fireman) has the wheel set ahead on the clock (engineer at 9:00 and fireman at either 6:00 or 3:00) or is that just a variation by prototype or by valve gear equipment?

Finally, the favor to ask: Would flyernut please be able to provide pictures of both the quartering jig and the wheel puller in use? Perhaps with multiple views (top, side, bottom)? I personally learn much better with pictures than I do with words.

Thanks and Happy New Year (off to another party at my sister's place soon),
Chuck
There should be a thread with pictures on here showing you all the info you're looking for.
 
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