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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As promised, here's my new quartering jig for 6 wheel steamers. The complete set consists of 2 side plates, center gauge, and a tool/screw stand, all fabricated by my good buddy, a fellow worker and hot-rodder, and like me, stock car builder in the past. 003.JPG

004.JPG
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
The off-set from side to side is exactly like the original tools, 87 degrees, (90 we all know will work).
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
First, you install one wheel to the side of the jig, screwing it from the back with a 4-40 Allen 005.JPG

006.JPG head screw.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I then add the wheel spacing gauge, securing it to the bottom of the chassis, using the grease pan hole.. This is a neat little deal that I never thought of..This piece of aluminum stock is the exact width you must have between wheel flanges. I'll go into further detail in a later picture. 009.JPG
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
You then insert the half of the jig on to the chassis, putting the axles through the bushings, and then add the second half of the jig over the ends of the axles. 010.JPG
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
When assembled, and making sure all the axle end are started correctly, simply put the assembly in a vise and slowly tighten it together. That center piece of stock, or wheel gauge, is actually a "stop", letting you know the wheel assemblies are installed and at the correct gauging. You can't over-tighten, however you must tighten it until the wheel assembly jig bottoms out, or the gauging will be off, (too much width)... I used it on this practice chassis several times now, and it seems to work flaw-lessly.. 011.JPG But, as I always say, when it passes my lay-out test, then it will be declared a winner,lol.
 

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'Nut --

Nice craftsmanship. Simple components, but quite reliable and functional.

Do most AF 6-wheel motor allow a jig like this to fit on the motor casing, without other motor stuff getting in the way? Just curious. I know on the Lionel prewar end, there are often parts of the motor frame that would bump in the way of a jig like this.

The off-set from side to side is exactly like the original tools, 87 degrees, (90 we all know will work).
OK ... you've stumped me here. Why 87 degrees? What's magic about that?!? I thought 90 was the preferred quartering target?

Cheers,

TJ
 

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Great quartering tool flyernut. Whats nice is you can do all 6 wheels at the same time.
And gauge them.
 

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OK ... you've stumped me here. Why 87 degrees? What's magic about that?!? I thought 90 was the preferred quartering target?

Cheers,

TJ
I never knew that, either, and I am interested in learning why as well. I wonder if it is to dampen a harmonic.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
'Nut --

Nice craftsmanship. Simple components, but quite reliable and functional.

Do most AF 6-wheel motor allow a jig like this to fit on the motor casing, without other motor stuff getting in the way? Just curious. I know on the Lionel prewar end, there are often parts of the motor frame that would bump in the way of a jig like this.



OK ... you've stumped me here. Why 87 degrees? What's magic about that?!? I thought 90 was the preferred quartering target?

Cheers,

TJ
If you notice on the sides of the jig, there are areas that were milled off, or milled at an angle. The plate, if left squared, would have hit several spots on the chassis, so the problem areas were eliminated... As for the 87 degrees, I knew that was the correct off-set, but to achieve that, it would have been impossible by eye, so 90 does work.. My guess is Gilbert, through trial and error, found that 87 was a better off-set..Any less or more, and you'll either get a clicking sound during running,or a bind in the linkage.
 

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Re: recesses. OK ... got it. Smart. Simple.

Re: 87. Hmmm ... neat. I never knew that. I wonder if Lionel did the same thing, or whether they are "true" at 90?

Cheers,

TJ
 

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Great idea and machining of the jig. I too had heard or read about the 87 degree deal but never thought much about it or understood why. Thanks for the clarification.
 

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Quartering Fixture

Great addition to your toolbox! You've inspired me once again. I've been kicking around building one of those for myself for some time. Seeing this post is my motivation. I especially like the wheel gauge that attaches to the frame. Nice idea and craftsmanship!:appl:
 
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