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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I started a experimental project of converting a steel Reading Northeastern type caboose to a wood version. The wood version of the Reading cabooses had basically the same layout and dimensions as the steel counterparts.

I decided to sacrifice a MTH Railking caboose, as the handrails and various parts are easily removed. I stripped the caboose of all the details and started shaving the rivets off with a flat blade razor. It took about an hour to remove all the rivets. I am filling some accidental gouges with Tamiya putty and sanding the entire model. A couple more sanding sessions and the caboose will be ready for the next step.

The plan is to carefully scribe the wood siding planks into the sanded surfaces. Not sure how I am going to accomplish that just yet…

Tom

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I'll be watching this project with interest although I don't have the patience (or skill) to do something like that.

The Reading made a few of these for the Lehigh and Hudson River. They were originally going to be steel sheathed, but due to wartime shortages, they ended up making them composite.
 

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Just a thought...................

Obtain some .010" thick styrene plastic sheet. Scribe lines and lightly sand for wood grain effect. Cut panels as required to glue on as an overlay on the caboose body structure.

While scribing lines on the caboose body would certainly be doable, it would take a LOT of extra fine, time-consuming and careful work to be presentable in the end.

Regardless, should be a great looking caboose no matter how you choose to accomplish it. (y)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Just a thought...................

Obtain some .010" thick styrene plastic sheet. Scribe lines and lightly sand for wood grain effect. Cut panels as required to glue on as an overlay on the caboose body structure.

While scribing lines on the caboose body would certainly be doable, it would take a LOT of extra fine, time-consuming and careful work to be presentable in the end.

Regardless, should be a great looking caboose no matter how you choose to accomplish it. (y)
Thanks Matt. I was thinking the same thing as far as the siding. I am going to give that a try.

Tom
I'll be watching this project with interest although I don't have the patience (or skill) to do something like that.

The Reading made a few of these for the Lehigh and Hudson River. They were originally going to be steel sheathed, but due to wartime shortages, they ended up making them composite.
Bob, I may not have great skills, but I am willing to learn! If it works out, I will do a L&HR as it is a local road that runs behind my house!

Tom
 

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For a wood grain effect on styrene I drag a razor saw over it sideways. If this sounds like an option I would suggest doing before you scribe the boards rather than after. Practice on a scrap first.

Pete
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Okay. Thanks Pete! I remember that technique from an old Bill McCelland book about scenery.

Tom
 

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I confused about shaing the rivets off a steel body. I gather they were not formed in the metal, just glued on?

Edit: I get it. It's a plastic model of an actual; steel caboose (sorry, I focus on tinplate).If that's the case, why not sand and scribe the wood lines directly on the plastic body?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
You could also try using thin wood as well, much easier to scribe board lines?
I have a few experiments in mind. The wood is a great suggestion too! I was even considering plank by plank.
I confused about shaing the rivets off a steel body. I gather they were not formed in the metal, just glued on?

Edit: I get it. It's a plastic model of an actual; steel caboose (sorry, I focus on tinplate).If that's the case, why not sand and scribe the wood lines directly on the plastic body?
I actually considered that approach. If I can get away with the scribed siding, I will go that route. If I scribe directly into the caboose, I would have to find a way of getting deep groves and keeping them uniform.

If the caboose was metal, I would just pound the rivets flat with a hammer! Lol

Tom
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Not sure what width boards were used for the prototype, but MicroMark sells scribed sheathing and ship decking that might look like tongue and groove.

Wood (micromark.com)
Thanks Bob. I just received their catalog in the mail. I will check that out.

Tom
 

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I started a experimental project of converting a steel Reading Northeastern type caboose to a wood version. The wood version of the Reading cabooses had basically the same layout and dimensions as the steel counterparts.

I decided to sacrifice a MTH Railking caboose, as the handrails and various parts are easily removed. I stripped the caboose of all the details and started shaving the rivets off with a flat blade razor. It took about an hour to remove all the rivets. I am filling some accidental gouges with Tamiya putty and sanding the entire model. A couple more sanding sessions and the caboose will be ready for the next step.

The plan is to carefully scribe the wood siding planks into the sanded surfaces. Not sure how I am going to accomplish that just yet…

Tom

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Tom;

Wouldn't it be easier to glue scribed styrene (or wood) sheets to the sanded flat walls of the caboose? Doing that would add an O-scale 3/4" or so to the width of the caboose. I don't know if that's an issue for you or not.
If you do decide to scribe your own lines, I suggest pre- measuring & marking the "board widths" along both the top, & bottom, of the side walls, and then setting a carpenter's square along the bottom edge and lining it up with each succeeding set of marks to guide your scribe.

Good Luck & Have Fun;

Traction Fan
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Tom;

Wouldn't it be easier to glue scribed styrene (or wood) sheets to the sanded flat walls of the caboose? Doing that would add an O-scale 3/4" or so to the width of the caboose. I don't know if that's an issue for you or not.
If you do decide to scribe your own lines, I suggest pre- measuring & marking the "board widths" along both the top, & bottom, of the side walls, and then setting a carpenter's square along the bottom edge and lining it up with each succeeding set of marks to guide your scribe.

Good Luck & Have Fun;

Traction Fan
Thanks TF.

I am leaning in that direction. I ordered some sheet styrene and scribed sheets. I am looking to see how thin I can go on the siding with out losing the window frames, etc.

The sheets should arrive tomorrow and I will have a better idea of the way I want to go on this.

Pre-measuring the lines is a great idea. I was thinking how to layout a pattern and your idea will work for me. Thanks!

Tom
 

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Perhaps make a jig. ... a customized version of TF's carpenters square. But thin enough so the back edge aligns with the previous scribe. Then just move it along the caboose's side using the back edge as the width measurement.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Perhaps make a jig. ... a customized version of TF's carpenters square. But thin enough so the back edge aligns with the previous scribe. Then just move it along the caboose's side using the back edge as the width measurement.
Good suggestion! I have a small machinist square I was gonna use.

Tom
 

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Thanks TF.

I am leaning in that direction. I ordered some sheet styrene and scribed sheets. I am looking to see how thin I can go on the siding with out losing the window frames, etc.

The sheets should arrive tomorrow and I will have a better idea of the way I want to go on this.

Pre-measuring the lines is a great idea. I was thinking how to layout a pattern and your idea will work for me. Thanks!

Tom
Tom;

I went back and looked at your photo again, and I don't understand your concern for "loosing the window frames." The widow frames on your "donor", steel, caboose appear to be riveted steel angles. Wouldn't a wood caboose have wooden window frames? I would think you could just sand off any remaining riveted "steel" frames, cut the openings, and then frame them with pieces of styrene strip stock.

Traction Fan 🙂
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Tom;

I went back and looked at your photo again, and I don't understand your concern for "loosing the window frames." The widow frames on your "donor", steel, caboose appear to be riveted steel angles. Wouldn't a wood caboose have wooden window frames? I would think you could just sand off any remaining riveted "steel" frames, cut the openings, and then frame them with pieces of styrene strip stock.

Traction Fan 🙂
yes, I am headed in that direction. I received the sheet styrene samples I ordered. I may go with the pre-scribed siding.

I was just trying to save the window frames in case I ended up scribing the side of the caboose directly.

Tom
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I had some spare time today, so I started up on the Reading wood caboose.

I sanded down the sides smooth. I decided to give the Evergreen O scale siding sheet a try. I have pretty much covered all the areas of the caboose that have the tongue and groove siding. The caboose has many steel areas including the corners of the cupola and portions of the end walls.

I was able to determine this as Bob (Lehigh74) sent me a copy of the layout diagram for the Reading wood caboose. Thanks Bob!

I have to start trimming out the window frames, door frames and various edges next.

Tom

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Yes. That is going to look good. You’ve got me thinking I might try it, but if I do I think I would use a Weaver. I could probably pick one up for less than a Railking.

One thing I noticed and it might be too late, but the NMn didn’t have windows on the ends.
 
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