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Well yes, those old bulbs do get hot. I see now in #2 photo that the little woven fiber insulator that the bulb slides into before being put into that brass fitting is missing. You’ll need to acquire or make a replacement to keep that area cool.
As far as the loco not budging when light is active. Does the motor work at all? In photo #5, the spring and brush assembly looks hokey, needs attention.
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Well yes, those old bulbs do get hot. I sse now in #2 photo that the little woven fiber insulator that the bulb slides into before being put into that brass fitting is missing. You’ll need to acquire or make a replacement.
As far as the loco not budging when light is active. Does the motor work at all? In photo #5, the spring and brush assembly looks hokey, needs attention.
Most I’ve gotten from it is a slight jump in the motor but no movement as for the entirety of the locomotive. I don’t know if I can find a new light or not.
 

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I think what he meant was have you tried to touch DC leads directly to the motor, bypassing the whole concept of getting electricity from the tracks up to the motor.

If you have tried that, and the motor still won't spin, then the motor is the problem.
 

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Pretty sure I have. I’ve touched just about every part visible in the loco with that wire
The brush springs on these motors are very light and easily knocked out of place. In your photo you can see the tail end of the torsion spring sticking out to the right of the loco. It needs to be snapped back under the metal tab on the opposite side. As it is, there's no spring tension on the top brush.

These early 70's Bachmanns were better than the later pancake versions, but once Tyco opened that Pandora's box many manufacturers ditched more expensive designs like this. These motors were designed a lot like the large scale slot car motors from the 60's. and ran well enough even if they were noisy. I've replaced the motor in one of mine with a good can, replaced the shaft couplings with slicone fuel line tubing, added a ton of weight, and it runs better and quieter than a super weighted Athearn blue box.

The wheel rims coming loose is a common problem, and the can be glued back to the hub with a little CA, as someone already noted. If you don't know much about the internals of model locomotives, old units like these make for a great test bed and learning experience.
 

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Motor vehicle Circuit component Electrical wiring Gas Wire

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This is what things should look like.
You would do better to just get a 3mm LED with a resistor attached. A 5mm may fit as well, I’ll have to check.

Update: 5mm LEDs do not fit. So 3mm it is.

This is also a close up of what the brush retention system looks like when in working order.
 

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I went on the Kato website. They have made N and HO since 1957. Although they don't specifically mention who they made parts for, they may have made parts for other manufacturers. If I'm wrong, please correct me. I would rather have people learn from my mistakes.A
 
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