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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can anyone recommend what gauge wire I need to get for my 1033 transformer? I need to replace the power cord and want to get the right stuff. I'm assuming stranded wire is what I need. Any tips / precautions I need to be aware of? I took the cover off and it looks okay inside. Thanks.
 

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When I replaced the cord on my LW, I just went to Walmart and bought an extension cord and cut the socket off. Worked for me and I think that I paid like $5 for it.
 

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Go to Home Depot and buy an extension cord for $1 and cut the socket off. It is plenty heavy enough for a transformer. 90 watts at 120 volts is only 0.75 amps. The cord will probably be 16 gauge which is good for 15 amps in open air.

Bruce Baker
 

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Not that I'm recommending this, but when I was at the Wilmington, MA train show a few weeks ago, I saw that the guys from East Coast Train Partsy were selling repro Lionel power cords with the "Lionel" emblem molded into the power plug. Around $5, I think.

They had the same cords, but without the Lionel emblem for around $3, I think!

I'm not sure about the 1033, but the cords usually have a knot-loop on them, just inside the transformer case, such that any pull on the cord won't put stress/fatigue on the soldered ends. Make sure you use a knot.

Cheers,

TJ
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I noticed the knot when I opened it up and planned to do the same. Thanks for making sure I do that. I think for now I just want it working and will just get a generic black cord. I'll keep an eye out for the repro ones that say lionel, though. I have two other transformers that need new ones.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Just wanted to update this thread as well. I opened up the 1033 and replaced the cord. All went as planned. I tinned the ends of the new cord before soldering it in, which worked out well. It it made the wire firm enough to push it into place as the soldering iron began to melt the solder that was still in the hole in the board. I was a little disappointed with the performance of the transformer, though. The 2343 seemed to run a little better using the Tech II. I guess that shouldn't surprise me. The Tech II puts out 0 to 17 volts, while the 1033 only goes to 16 volts.
 

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Sounds to me like you need to lube the 2343. Take off the shell and then remove the two screws that hold the motor to the truck. I seem to remember you have to remove a screw that holds the coupler on. A little fiddling, and you should be able to remove the truck and get at the gears and bearings. Usually, you will find the truck full of dried grease. Remove the dried grease using WD-40 and brake clean. Then oil everything with 5W-20 motor oil. I did this recently to a 2333 and it is the smoothest running engine ever. Oil the motors also. There should be an oil hole in the top of the motors. I oil the commutators on my engines because it reduces the friction and makes them run smoother. Your choice. Clean the commutator slots before you do this.

Bruce Baker
 

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In the past, I have paid too much for things. I have found the prices at swap meets to be the best. $7-8 for 1033s is a good price.

Bruce Baker
 

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a 5 amp diode will work just fine. The current rating is rms, so, since the diode is on only half the time, it will handle a 10 amp output from the transformer.

Bruce Baker
 

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When the whistle controller is in the second position, there is a low ohm resister shunting the diode, so the current through the diode is much reduced.

BB
 

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When the whistle controller is in the second position, there is a low ohm resister shunting the diode, so the current through the diode is much reduced.

BB
Bruce,

I was reading/writing about that the other day, but in the specific case of a 167 stand-alone whistle controller. There, the internal relay contacts rout the circuit through the shunt as the button gets pushed down to its full extent. (Spec sheets said the pre-shunt DC output would be higher to close an onboard whistle relay, and that the post-shunt lower DC output would be enough to hold it there.)

Does that same sort of setup (with mechanic relay contacts) exist in something like a 1033 transformer with a built in whistle control?

Thanks,

TJ
 

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Yes it does. The first position of the controller pulls the relay in, and the 2nd position reduces the DC level but still has enough DC to hold the relay after it is pulled in. The 2nd position also raises the track voltage to allow the engine to keep running with the additional load of the whistle motor.

With a horn on a diesel that is powered by a battery, there is no need to raise the track voltage so the engine is going to speed up significantly.

BB
 
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