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Discussion Starter #1
http://www.lms10000.org/

The Brits are trying to replicate a historic diesel locomotive. What would it take to do this in the United States (say like a BLW Centipeed, a BLW/CNJ Dual-Cab, a Trainmaster, five-axle C-liner, or Erie-Built, or the CN Breadmore-Westinghouse No. 9000)? I know there is a whole bunch of rules and regulations, but what are the core points that need to be met to do a U.S. equivelent? - :confused: - Also, what would need to be done to bring the engines up to snuff with today's environment? For example, who holds the rights to the BLW 606, De La Vergen, and 608 engines? FM is still in the business with their 38D8 1/8 engines, but what about the Breadmores? In this project, they are using a second hand engine. If one was to replicate CN No. 9000, or the Baldwins forementioned, what would need to be done to that engine to make it "inline" with today's regulations?
 

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The federal government, namely the Dept. Of Transportation have promulgated a number of regulations concerning the diesel locomotives and the industry, its self has adopted a number standards for engine performance. The other questions would should be answered by someone who as engineering knowledge of the locomotives structures,engines, etc.
 

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UP's excursion E8s aren't E8s at all. They are I think gp38s with E8 skin. Doesn't seem hard to replicate old engines. New guts with different skin.


The iconic sounds would be missing.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
What are are modern Diesel locomotives built to in the USA (standard wise)?
 

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Emissions standards, fuel efficiency/consumption, and possibly noise pollution standards would be the main ones I'd imagine.

Maybe some safety stuff for engineers/operators, but nothing springs to mind immediately
 

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It takes deep pockets for any locomotive. I was reading SD40-2 were around $400,000
and that was in the early 70's. Modern engines are around 1.8 mil now.
 

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You'd probably have to do what is called in the hotrod world as a "resto-mod"

Take a chassis/powertrain from a modern engine and skin it in the old.

However - I'm sure there are old diesels out there in need of restoration, and you COULD probably get them running/operational again, but it would most likely be more expensive that going the resto-mod route.
 

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If you could find original pieces, it would be easier.........You don't need to have your old John Deere tractor meet tier 4 requirements to keep operating it. Older designs are grandfathered in to a point........but if you were building a NEW design that looked like an older model, you'd need to meet all the current specs since it isn't an old model still running, it's a new model. Not sure where the cut-off is, but I'm pretty sure all those vintage trains running in the museums and tourist RR's are not up to modern spec.
 

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yeah...but finding those parts you need for a diesel train that hasn't been made for 60 years might be harder than finding those tractor parts.

John Deere actively supports and still manufactures parts for their old tractors. Not so sure about the old EMD, etc. powerplants common in the 50's/60's
 
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