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I have a locomotive over 50 years old that does not run smoothly. I took it apart, and accidentally disconnected the wire that goes from the headlight back to the motor. Do I solder the wire to the post that the arrow points to in the attached photo? What else do I need to do to get this unit running again? I'm a newbie, so details are appreciated. The locomotive is from an old family collection I'm trying to get up and running again. Thanks for any help & suggestions. (Don't worry, I'm repainting the rails - "Rust" is too orange looking.)

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Yes, but it also can go on or under the bolt in the pix. Make sure it does not touch the wire on the other spring. As long as you have the power truck off. I would do some checking on the circuit. Usually, the power circuit on these comes from the metal wheels on the opposite trunk. Usually that wire goes to the light clip. A wire is soldered on the tip of the bulb. That wire connects under the bolt. That gives the voltage across the light and the motor. This is a series circuit. The problem is you have three connections that can cause problems. You can also create two parallel circuits. The first would come from the opposite truck to the appropriate brush clip. This appears to be what you have here. The light circuit Is completely separate from the motor operation. In that case there should be two wires from the bulb assembly. One from the bulb and one from the clip. These wires would connect to either brush clip. This Reduces the motor dependent joints to two. Fewer is always better.
I want you the verify the power truck circuit because normally the bolt is where the rear truck connects. You can verify that fairly easily.
 

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I'll be following this thread. Just to see how much the OP has been inapproiately confused concerning a simple fix. Touch the wire back to the pin the arrow is pointing to and test it. If doesn't work, test again elsewhere. Point will be found without issues.
More importantly; Said loco is running rough. More dialog needed concerning the cleaning and lubing of the innards. Now that, is a discussioun needed here.
 

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Well, yes, the light wire breaking / coming lose shouldn't affect the running of the loco. Running rough is just a feature of age. Lubricants don't last forever, and likely the ones on the loco have hardened over time. Using a cotton swabs, clean the gears and motor bushings with either isopropyl or denatured alcohol. Lubricate the bushings with a tiny drop of oil -- like put it on a toothpick or pin tiny. Lubricate the gears with a tiny dab of grease. Use dry graphite lubricant on the axle bearings. Don't just use any old products -- use ones specially designed for hobby use (LaBelle and Hob-e-Lube are two good and widely available brands).

Ordinarily, with a motor that old, I'd just recommend getting a new motor for it: new can motors with flywheeels are much smoother and more reliable than those old ones. Unfortunately, I don't know if there is a motor kit available for old Tyco / Mantua locks. Try Northwest Shortline. They also have a lot of good "how to" pages.
 

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I believe the wire may have been under the spring in the area I've marked blue, along the edge of the fiber board. Use a small pointed tool to rotate the spring away from the board and slip the wire in.

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