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Discussion Starter #1
Can someone explain to me excatly what a reverse loop is, I think i understand the basic concept, but how do you eliminate the short?
Do I need some kind of device to supply the power separately? any info anyone can offer is great!
I am new to this train scene, I have always wanted a model train (had one as a child, old dc) so, just pretend that i wont understand any lingo you old train guys have, so keep it simple. Thanks.
Trev
 

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The easiest way to wire a reverse loop is with an Atlas controller or twin when using dc. With dcc, they have auto-detectors that do it for you.

Basically, you're reversing polarity to the rest of the track while your train is on the loop, that way as it comes off, the polarity of the rest of the track matches. Reverse loops must be fully insulated of the rest of the track, both in dc and dcc.

There are other ways of doing this than the Atlas parts, but they're by far the easiest for us beginners :laugh:

Help?!
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
so do i have to have a controller? right now, i have an insulated loop, but i supplied the power from my NCE power cab controller, this seems to work ok, will i damage anything?:confused:
By the way, i really wish i could read the chinese,japanonese, or whatever it is that you responded in fghgjdh8, the rest of you, thanks for your replies, one thing i dont get smokey, i thought that dcc loco's did the polarity switching, i guess thats not the case, huh?
 

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Disregard that crap- we've been having issues with spam bots or some crap... :stroke:

'Bout your reverse loop, if you're running dcc, then isolating the loop and connecting it to the right connector on the main unit should do it, or you may need an add-on auto-reverse looper deal.

Either way, if you're running dcc, it should take care of itself. If you say you're up and running, then it sounds like you did it right.





























I will find a use for all the smileys eventually... gotta use them right, don'tchya know?!
 

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Disregard that crap- we've been having issues with spam bots or some crap... :stroke:

I will find a use for all the smileys eventually... gotta use them right, don'tchya know?!
ROTFLMAO! How did I know that you would be the first one to use that smiley... I think that leaves only one more which has not been used on here, I will wait for it to show up in one of your posts, but I have no clue how you will pull it off :laugh:

*ahem* Back to the OP's topic :rolleyes:
 

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ROTFLMAO! How did I know that you would be the first one to use that smiley... I think that leaves only one more which has not been used on here, I will wait for it to show up in one of your posts, but I have no clue how you will pull it off :laugh:

*ahem* Back to the OP's topic :rolleyes:
We aim to please.

(You aim, too, please... saw that on a bathroom wall... you know, beside the "joke's in your hand" one... :hah: !!!)





:D
 

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Discussion Starter #8
HO Scale confusion

Ok guys, now that we've covered that, can you guys explain the term 'HO Scale'? I know it is 1/87th scale, but does that mean that for every one inch in scale its 87 inches in real life? If so, can I build my own buildings,.....like if I were to build a house 40 feet by 40 feet by 20 feet in real life, would it be 6" by 6" by 3"????:eek:hwell::confused:
Or should i just stick with buying my bulidings and stuff?
I treid to build a bridge, but I think my math was confused, I thought that if I had steel beams that were (in real life) 12"X12"x252", then in scale they would be 1/8th" X 1/8th" X 3" (rough guesses) I used these calculations:
12" divided by 87=0.139, roughly 1/8 "...1/8"= .125"
252" divided by 87=2.89, roughly 3"
Is this right? Or am I on crack??
Thanks in advance
Trev :lol_hitting:
 

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Ok guys, now that we've covered that, can you guys explain the term 'HO Scale'? I know it is 1/87th scale, but does that mean that for every one inch in scale its 87 inches in real life? If so, can I build my own buildings,.....like if I were to build a house 40 feet by 40 feet by 20 feet in real life, would it be 6" by 6" by 3"????:eek:hwell::confused:
Or should i just stick with buying my bulidings and stuff?
I treid to build a bridge, but I think my math was confused, I thought that if I had steel beams that were (in real life) 12"X12"x252", then in scale they would be 1/8th" X 1/8th" X 3" (rough guesses) I used these calculations:
12" divided by 87=0.139, roughly 1/8 "...1/8"= .125"
252" divided by 87=2.89, roughly 3"
Is this right? Or am I on crack??
Thanks in advance
Trev :lol_hitting:

Yes:D
 
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