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Discussion Starter #1
The same shaft I repaired back in January or February this year sheared again last night, but it was the opposite end. It didn't shear the pins this time, it sheared the shaft itself.

It was an angled shear so it was easy to CCA it back into one piece. After the CCA dried, I overcoated the whole ball end and the shaft past the break with JB Weld. I also coated the other end just in case it would shear sometime in the future.

I still haven"t found any cardan shafts at 25-26mm. Bachmann"s are either too long or too short, and all of Athearn"s are too long.

Any ideas about a replacement at 25-26mm? I haven't had any trouble on the other end of the locomotive...yet.

Locomotive is running fine now after the repair. Cleaned wheels and contacts, and regreased the gear boxes while it was apart too.
 

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I'm happy to hear that your efforts have been rewarded and that they are long-lived (it didn't break under your previous repair, so good for you). I prefer epoxy for repairs that are meant to also improve the robustness of the area damaged. I recently purchased five new stovetop knobs to replace our broken GE ones. It wasn't a cheap purchase for five plastic knobs that are made for $1 each. But, I knew they wouldn't stand up to our handling for the same reason the originals didn't. When I got them, I went out to the train room, mixed a small dollop of two-part LePage's epoxy (that twinned syringe) and then coated the plastic wells that go around the stems embedded in the stovetop panel. I roughed them up first with sand paper to generate some 'tooth'. What was left when it cured was a 1.5mm thick 'collar' of hard epoxy that will prevent those wells from cracking as they did before.

Could you find longish cardan shafts, bisect them, remove a few mm, maybe even at that same angle to get a generous repair surface for an adhesive, and then fashion the repair with even 1 m of epoxy as a stiffener? It might be worth a try.
 

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It might come to that. The shaft just gave out again not ten minutes ago. I haven't opened it up yet to see what the damage is. I will probably wait until tomorrow. I'm in the middle of cleaning another locomotive now.

I think 'm going to disassemble that gear box and see if there is something hanging up in there.
 

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It might come to that. The shaft just gave out again not ten minutes ago. I haven't opened it up yet to see what the damage is. I will probably wait until tomorrow. I'm in the middle of cleaning another locomotive now.

I think 'm going to disassemble that gear box and see if there is something hanging up in there.
MichaelE

I'm not sure what a cardan shaft is. Is it the drive shaft that connects the motor to the gearbox? Those are usually made with two projections that fit into slots on the gearbox & motor's own internal drive shafts. The assembly acts as a universal joint to smooth out any variations in the position of the trucks. If that's what keeps breaking, maybe you could make your own from brass tubing or brass rod. That should hold up better than plastic.

Traction Fan
 

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Discussion Starter #5
A cardan shaft is what is called a driveshaft or propeller shaft in the States. Same as the driveshaft on an older RWD car from the 80's and earlier.
 
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