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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited by Moderator)
Not sure if this is the correct forum for this.
If not I am sure a moderator will relocate it.
Just looking for any input from the elders.....<------:laugh:

I am an instant gradification type of guy.

I originally built a 4X8 table at 48 3/4" high as to utilize a 21' ledge that I have in my basement.
After reading many posts I realized that I need to be able to get to the other side of the table to efficiently make a good layout.

Also was afraid of a steep grade to make it to the ledge.

Well today I was chopping, sanding and leveling.
Dropped it down 5"

This forum has a ton of info as well as well behaved members who prove to be very helpful so far.

Math was never my strong suit so I am definately shooting from the hip here.

This is where I am at now.

height:
Actual Table 42 3/4
Add foam 44 3/4
Ledge 47 1/4 I may add 1" foam
Ledge plus Plywood 48"

Width:
first table 40 1/2"
Ledge 8"
second table @ end of 21' ledge 4'X4'

Length:
first table 96"
Ledge including second table 21'

I am hoping that rising 2-3" in 8' is not too much of a grade......eeeekss!!

OK going to watch the Super Bowl.....Go Pats!!!!
 

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Maybe add a spur with a bridge across "the big giant gap" over to the ledge, just for fun? Something tucked towards the fireplace wall, so you still have good person access along most of the back length of hte layout?
 

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I have a ledge just like yours. My plan is to place track to store excess rolling stock inventory,,,everybody else has excess rolling stock inventory, right?

Maybe a 3 track switching yard?

Go GIANTS!!!!!!!
 

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I had asked this question b4 due to my math skills not being the best i was told about 15 feet to rise 3 inches!
 

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I had asked this question b4 due to my math skills not being the best i was told about 15 feet to rise 3 inches!
Remember inclines don't have to go up straight, a nice curving incline makes it look more realistic anyway. At least I have never seen a train go straight up a mountain.
 

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WOW - that table looks like it would support a car :D. That's going to be quite the grade but if it's just used for storage a good engine and just a few cars should climb it.
 

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Thanx Sean,... that went into my e-manual.... Getting ready to start my BIG board and that is an integral part of the plan!
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Just an FYI ... I am gonna mess this first layout up out like crazy...
LOL....Thanks for all of the help so far...
 

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I like to think of your first layout as more of a learning experience rather than anything that will truly get finished.

I built an 11x13 layout first and then later tore it up (precipitated by a move), but I decided to totally rebuild into something new rather than just re-assemble the old layout. Too many things I learned as I ran trains that I didn't like in the old layout.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
First LYFAO! :laugh:

Then Please Help!!!!

I plan on using cork bedding for the rest of my layout. This portion will be inside of a cave.

Is cork the best to use?

Should I cut wedges to take the 18" radius curve?

How do most adhere the bedding to a foam layout?

How do most tack the track to a foam layout?

Pic #2 Is this OK to use for soldering track Joints wires etc. ?

If so must I use flux?

One more thing to make you LYFAO!.
That awkward moment when you realize you just spent 70.00 on a used engine that you can buy brand new for 50.00...!!!!:mad:
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Make sure you figure on curves around those corners, looks like you'll need some support a bit farther out. :)
Ya I was thinking the same thing!!!
Gotta figure out the grade first.
Thanks for the input...
Anything else you see that could pose a problem or where I can improve, please LMK!!!
Thank You.
 

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I plan on using cork bedding for the rest of my layout. This portion will be inside of a cave.

Is cork the best to use?

Should I cut wedges to take the 18" radius curve?

How do most adhere the bedding to a foam layout?

How do most tack the track to a foam layout?
Cork is easy to use. It come pre-cut to split into two halves. For curves, separate it into two halves, premark your track centerline on the foam (Sharpie), and then use a hot glue gun to adhere just one half of the cork with the edge abutted directly on your centerline mark. The cork half will bent quite easily to your curve ... no need to cut it into wedges. Apply a thin bead of hot glue down then middle of the cork "target" ... you don't want the hot glue to squeeze over the centerline mark. Work in a section no longer than about 18", otherwise the glue will dry prematurely. After you get that 18" section down (it'll adhere/dry quickly), then glue down the mating section on the other side of the centerline. It's helpful to stagger the end joints of cork between the left and right halves. You don't have to precut the cork to the 18" glued length ... just glue 18", with the other end (remaining 18") freefloating, until you're ready to glue that down.

As for the track itself, nails or tacks won't do much to hold it to foam. You'll get some grab with a small nail into the cork, but not a great amount. Many guys here have had good success adhering the track to the cork with a few dabs of clear latex caulk. When dry, it'll offer good grab, but not so much that you can't remove the track at some point for future layout mods.

TJ
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Cork is easy to use. It come pre-cut to split into two halves. For curves, separate it into two halves, premark your track centerline on the foam (Sharpie), and then use a hot glue gun to adhere just one half of the cork with the edge abutted directly on your centerline mark. The cork half will bent quite easily to your curve ... no need to cut it into wedges. Apply a thin bead of hot glue down then middle of the cork "target" ... you don't want the hot glue to squeeze over the centerline mark. Work in a section no longer than about 18", otherwise the glue will dry prematurely. After you get that 18" section down (it'll adhere/dry quickly), then glue down the mating section on the other side of the centerline. It's helpful to stagger the end joints of cork between the left and right halves. You don't have to precut the cork to the 18" glued length ... just glue 18", with the other end (remaining 18") freefloating, until you're ready to glue that down.

As for the track itself, nails or tacks won't do much to hold it to foam. You'll get some grab with a small nail into the cork, but not a great amount. Many guys here have had good success adhering the track to the cork with a few dabs of clear latex caulk. When dry, it'll offer good grab, but not so much that you can't remove the track at some point for future layout mods.

TJ
Hey that's some awesome tips!!!
Thank you very much!
 
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