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I'll try to describe my question.... I used Woodland Scenics 3% risers on my HO 5'x9' layout. I used cork roadbed for the entire layout. When the roadbed transistions from the level surface of the base board at the bottom of the incline it forms a dip. The track then wants to set 1/8" to 1/4" above the cork roadbed in this area and make its own transition, which accually is a smoother transition into the incline. My question is how is this space filled in?? I'm afraid if I just push the track down to the roadbed it may cause issues with derailing or uncoupling. Has anyone else experienced this issue?
 

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You can use door frame shims, or... I just use ballast.

I find that flex track (if that's what you're using) does a nice job of creating its own horizontal and vertical curves. So, if there's a gap, and my roadbed doesn't quite match the curvature of the tracks, I simply fill the gap with more ballast. When you pour your ballast and groom it, it'll fall naturally under the ties, and if it isn't quite supporting the ties, tap the rails gently with your grooming brush, and then pour a bit more. Or, what I sometimes do is to lift the rails a bit, just a gentle tug and lift, and pour more ballast where you need it to be. Let the rails sag, another tap, and you can go ahead and glue the ballast.
 

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Dip not good. Shim it with with cardboard of increasing thickness.

Check out the first picture in this post... https://www.modeltrainforum.com/showpost.php?p=2301100&postcount=65
Actually, the dip is EXACTLY what you want to see... provided that it's a nice gradual curve and not a kink. It's properly called a vertical easement, and provides a gentle transition on and off of the slope. You'll want to achieve the same thing at the top of the slope.

That said, Stumpy is right -- you will need some support under the track, but the possibilities of what to use are virtually limitless.
 

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I'm a fan of the 'door shims' idea myself. Especially the longer (10-12"?) ones made of cedar wood. If you can find them. Easier to cut and shape imo.
 
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