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Discussion Starter #1
im in the middle of building a layout but im stuck on what i should do next. i have roadbed glued and put down and i have just finished situated the track on the roadbed. what should i do next?
 

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I would wire it up for track power and start running some trains. From there you can go on to assembling buildings, doing landscaping, ballasting track, etc. You can skip around from project to project or area to area around your layout. There are many methods of building out a layout and everyone does it their own way.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
ok thank you. i was assuming it was wiring up the track. but i just wanted to double check
 

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Mark is right oh. You want your track and wiring to be fully trouble free before you start on any
scenic works. Like he said, run your trains. Discover any derail or power problems and
get them fixed before you start any fancy stuff. It would be a shame to have a nice ballasted track
with greenery off to the side and find some glitch that might require tearing it up.

Don
 

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im in the middle of building a layout but im stuck on what i should do next. i have roadbed glued and put down and i have just finished situated the track on the roadbed. what should i do next?
Trainman40;

I agree with Mark's advice, wiring & thorough run testing should come next.
What electrical control system will you be using, traditional DC, or DCC? The latter means a lot less wiring, the option of sound from the locomotives, and ultimately a lot more fun.
It's one of the nice things about our hobby that we can jump around from one thing to another. If you get bored with ballasting track, you can switch to making trees, or building structures.
However, at some points we need to keep on with one activity until we're sure that part works, before moving on. This is one of the many advantages of building a model railroad in sections. You can build the benchwork, & sub-roadbed, lay the roadbed , then the track, and then the wiring, for only one section, fairly quickly. Then you can move on to scenery, structures, ballsting, etc, for that one section. You don't have to spend a long amount of time doing just wiring or just ballasting, for the entire railroad.

Good Luck & Have Fun!

Traction Fan 🙂
 

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I hope you won't mind some advice here: while you are securing your tracks, and wiring them, and then determining if what you have in place works well with the rolling stock you're going to run, NOW is the time to second-guess your whole track plan, or at least don't overlook, or minimize, the one or two spots where you think you may have gone wrong, or could do better.

IOW, do look critically at what you have, and be prepared to acknowledge honestly that something is not quite right. Take it up, fix it, and trial it again. Might cost you a week or two, but you'll be happier. It will work better, and you'll get more life out of your creation than just a few weeks until you get disappointed and don't run it at all any more.

And yes, after your tracks are in place, even if just with a few track nails to keep it all put, wire it up so that you can run trials of your rolling stock, trailing and shoving. After all that, you can start to craft your scenery. If you have hills and rock cuts, you can craft them on liftable modules set in place. If you need to get at some of the structure below them, just lift them out of the way and you have access to things like staging, wiring, risers that need shims under them....that sort of thing. Even if it's just on a flat piece of plywood, you can lift them out and set them aside to be placed when you make a new layout.
 

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As the others have said, there is no set order that you have to do things. But you're at a critical phase right now. The suggestion to test what you have is excellent, and I'll wholeheartedly second that motion. You don't want to spend hours doing ballast or scenery, only to find that you have to RIP a portion of it out to fix an operating problem. Test your track, rolling stock, turnouts, and operating scheme thoroughly before you fasten anything down too permanently.

This is also a good time to use structure mock-ups to be sure your intended structures will fit where you want them too.

If everything runs well and fits properly, fasten it down carefully to make sure it stays that way. Then enjoy the rest of the building process as you see fit. There's no wrong way to do it.
 
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Discussion Starter #8
CTValleyRR, mesenteria, [B]traction fan[/B]. thank you all. im using dcc and yes i know the wiring setup is different to dc. i have a couple of dc locomotives that are super old and i intend to make them dcc. what ill do is run those and if those old timers run smooth and problem free then i'll know my track and wiring are fine.

if my worst can run then so can my best
 

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CTValleyRR, mesenteria, [B]traction fan[/B]. thank you all. im using dcc and yes i know the wiring setup is different to dc. i have a couple of dc locomotives that are super old and i intend to make them dcc. what ill do is run those and if those old timers run smooth and problem free then i'll know my track and wiring are fine.

if my worst can run then so can my best
Trainman40;

It sounds like you have a plan for what needs to be done next. You're right, if your older DC locomotives will run well, then newer DCC ones, or the same older locos converted to DCC will run better. One way to test trackwork is to run a full train loco and a dozen cars or so, frontwards and then, if all seems well, backwards. Pushing a string of cara backward, with the loco at the rear, will find any track problems you might not have noticed before. Just go slow, and put cardboard, or some other temporary barrier around the table to keep cars from falling to the floor! :mad: I take it this is not your first railroad, since you have locos from years back.

Good Luck & Have Fun!

Traction Fan 🙂
 

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Discussion Starter #10
well this is actually my first layout. I'm building it with my dad and the older trains are his. thanks for the carboard tip. its a good replacement till i eventually put a fascia and plexiglass
 
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