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Discussion Starter #241
Hey traction!

I actually started 2 replies and fell out from nyquil.. But yes, I didn't know it was a modelers trick, but when I did the first "behind the building", it just seemed more interesting to me. I didn't know why, but it did.

This time it was a deliberate, attempt. I wanted to simulate a train going into and under the silos to pickup loads. The road house(it's really a locomotive repair shop) was just an added bonus.

I will have to take another shot to show what it actually does, but now it goes through the owning in the silos, then, into the back of, and out one of the front doors of the repair shop. Then, it snakes through the 2 it's, and behind the last building of the cement factory(right most building). So, actually the whole back wal, the train is only seen snippets of time.

And that light blue house is more of a colonial type. I honestly thought about the cities where I live. We have such a tremendous industrial presence, that honestly, the trains go through both the lower, middle, and high income areas(we all share the noise).

But as an aside, the rail lines are so complex and numerous, that honestly, if I can increase my skill level, I would love to do my local. We have massive industry, with automotive, steel, salt mine, natural gas, Dow chemical, cement, water treatment, and more. Then, across the river, we have another country. Not to mention the barges up and down the river. It would be a monumental scratch building challenge. And this is all within probably a 20 to 30 mile radius. There is so much here honestly..

And it goes without saying, that my skills are nowhere near where they'd need to be. But that is my dream layout.

Im trying to remember what else after this long reply..
 

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Discussion Starter #242
And your buildings at least look good. Mine for the most part are out of the box builds, with slight paints and no real weathering.

But I will try and get those pictures between tonight and tomorrow...
 

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Detroit?

Hey traction!

I actually started 2 replies and fell out from nyquil.. But yes, I didn't know it was a modelers trick, but when I did the first "behind the building", it just seemed more interesting to me. I didn't know why, but it did.

This time it was a deliberate, attempt. I wanted to simulate a train going into and under the silos to pickup loads. The road house(it's really a locomotive repair shop) was just an added bonus.

I will have to take another shot to show what it actually does, but now it goes through the owning in the silos, then, into the back of, and out one of the front doors of the repair shop. Then, it snakes through the 2 it's, and behind the last building of the cement factory(right most building). So, actually the whole back wal, the train is only seen snippets of time.

And that light blue house is more of a colonial type. I honestly thought about the cities where I live. We have such a tremendous industrial presence, that honestly, the trains go through both the lower, middle, and high income areas(we all share the noise).

But as an aside, the rail lines are so complex and numerous, that honestly, if I can increase my skill level, I would love to do my local. We have massive industry, with automotive, steel, salt mine, natural gas, Dow chemical, cement, water treatment, and more. Then, across the river, we have another country. Not to mention the barges up and down the river. It would be a monumental scratch building challenge. And this is all within probably a 20 to 30 mile radius. There is so much here honestly..

And it goes without saying, that my skills are nowhere near where they'd need to be. But that is my dream layout.

Im trying to remember what else after this long reply..


MatroxD;

Watch out for that nyquil stuff, it sounds pretty powerful! :laugh:

It sounds like you are living inside your dream, in a way, or else inside the prototype for a lot of 4x8 model railroads, track in everyone's backyard! :laugh:
Do you live in Detroit? Since "Across the river is another country"and there is automobile industry nearby, Detroit sounds like a reasonable guess. Of course San Diego, where I live, is also across a river from another country, and some automobiles, or parts thereof, are made in Mexico. You may need to start saving your pennies to buy a warehouse or bowling alley. That's about the amount of space you would need to build all the things you mentioned on your dream layout! ;)

I still can't identify which of your structures is the roadhouse, not that it really matters. I guessed the blue house because, well it was the only house I could see, and it looks too large to be a single-family home. It's a nice looking structure, whatever its "official" designation. (by you)

Skills in model railroading, as in anything else, are only acquired by practice & experience. I've got over forty years of those things under my belt. There is nothing wrong with "out of the box kits, except high cost, and non-infinite selection.
If there had been a really nice N-scale plastic kit for Seattle Union Station available, I could have saved a lot of scratch-building effort! :D Unfortunately the potential profit making demand for hundreds of models of that particular structure didn't exist, so neither did a kit. :( I was able to form the two long walls from kitbashing of commercial models, but the rest had to be scratch-built. I had fun building it, and I'm pleased with the result. I need to take new pictures of the station, since I've added some more detail.

My favorite weathering material is chalk. It looks great, it's cheap, and it's easy to use. You should give it a try. Weathering a structure could be a good "It's freezing outside & I feel crummy inside" activity while you're sick.
I bought a basic set of "pastel chalks" from the craft department of my local Walmart for $3 years ago, and I'm still using them. They may have rocketed up in price to $5 or so by now, but that's still cheap.
Be sure to get "pastel chalks" not "pastels" which are like crayons, and not suitable for weathering. Pastel chalks come in little rectangular sticks about 3/8" square and 3" long.

You can apply chalk in three different ways.

1) Scraping along the stick with an X-acto knife will produce home made, inexpensive, "weathering powders." That's all those high-priced commercial weathering powders are, finely ground, colored, chalk; at about 1000% price markup! By the way, if you have a lot of brick buildings to weather, you can use powdered chalk made to be used in a "chalk line" tool. The flat red/ pink color is good for bricks. You can buy it at Home Depot.

2) Chalk can also be applied directly, by gently scraping a stick of chalk across the wall of a structure, and then using a finger to spread it around.

3) My own favorite way to apply chalk is to "paint" it on with an artist's paintbrush dipped in water. I drag the wet brush along the chalk stick, and then brush the water/chalk mixture onto the model. The brick station, tugboat, and freight cars, in the photos were weathered using chalk.

Nyquil may be giving you a less-than-subtle-hint to sleep more, and model railroad less. Get well soon. :)

Traction Fan :smilie_daumenpos:

Seattle Union Station concourse end 2.JPG

Seattle Union Station side view.JPG

Seattle Union Station 5.JPG

Seattle Union Station top view.JPG

tug closeup sharp focus.JPG

tug & FLOAT opposite side.JPG

tug & float top view.JPG
 

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Discussion Starter #244 (Edited)
Hey traction.. Yes im in the hub of all industry madness.. It really would take, add you said a small building to do a layout based off Detroit accurately. There are so many lines intertwined within each little satellite city. And then, there's the history aspect and what one would choose to attempt to recreate.

And then, there's the skill, that, even of I tried, I'm not there yet. I am going to try and do some of the pastel chalk. That was an awesome tip and thank you. The only thing is they were saying oil pastels where i looked. I'd that's the correct thing, they're massively cheap.. I am sending the wife to pick up a set for me tomorrow. What do you use to seal the chalk weathering after your done? Im actually excited to try it.. Chalks seem like they'd be very forgiving..

And the nyquil... Well, that's why im just responding. I wad in a haze for 2 days..
 

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Discussion Starter #245
And the roadhouse is the large brown building on the left in the picture attached..
 

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pastel chalks

And are these the kind your talking about?

MatroxD;

They could be, but I don't see the key word "chalk" on the package, so I can't be sure from a photo. They're the right shape though. Thirty-six colors is probably more shades than you will ever use. My original Walmart set has ten, I did later buy another box of ten grays there, and still later a box of "earth tones" from www.micromark.com so I now do have thirty overall. I still think the many shades of purple, "taupe", "mauve" and other colors known only to females, included are likely to stay in the box, since they would be useless for weathering. The "oil pastels", in your previous post, are probably the crayon clones I warned you not to buy for weathering. The important point is that the type you want are compressed sticks of powdered chalk, like the chalk you used to write on a blackboard with. (If your schooling included such ancient technology. :laugh:) These days teachers probably just send a mass text message to all the kids phones, since that's what they all spend their entire lives starring into anyway! :rolleyes: Speaking of technology, typos, or autocorrect, have made some funny changes to your post! Look back at it and see. :D
You might ask your wife to check for pastel chalks at Walmart, rather than Michael's. The Walmart version may still have "chalks" printed on the package. Or for $5 I guess you could try the Michael's ones.

I don't use anything to "seal" my chalk weathering on a model. The chalk stays on quite well by itself, especially when "painted" on with a wet brush. Even cars, which get handled, don't lose their weathering in the process. Some people use Dulcoat to "seal" the chalk onto their models.
I've tried that, but the Dullcoat erases 95% of the chalk weathering job I just did, so no more Dullcoat for me.

regards;

Traction Fan :smilie_daumenpos:

Buy the Soft Pastels by Artist's Loft Fundamentals at Michaels
https://www.michaels.com/soft-pastels-by-artists-loft-fundamentals/10421601.html?cm_mmc=PLASearch-_-google-_-MICH_Shopping_US_N_ArtSupplies_Markers&Pens&Pencils_N_N_N-_-&Kenshoo_ida=&KPID=go_cmp-6723840686_adg-78851611109_ad-388052366631_pla-825219976799_dev-m_ext-_prd-10421601&gclid=CjwKCAiA3uDwBRBFEiwA1VsajBflDVm_dnf4wYf3rK7GHOLvQYHmEqsj6TGVSOzKG57_2y6nS4doxRoC2BsQAvD_BwE


https://www.hobbylobby.com/Art-Supplies/Drawing-Illustration/Pastels-Chalk/48-Color-Soft-Pastel-Sticks/p/138006
filler filler filler
 

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"Roadhouse?!!

And the roadhouse is the large brown building on the left in the picture attached..
MatroxD;

Thanks for clearing up, "The case of the invisible roadhouse" mystery. That big brown building looks more like an engine house than a roadhouse to me. Can't see Patrick Swayze working as a bouncer in that building! :laugh:

Traction Fan :smilie_daumenpos:
 

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Discussion Starter #249 (Edited)
Lol, yes.. Keyboards on the phones, i have a love hate relationship with them..

And yes, she's in Michael's, as I type this getting them for me.

And ok, got you on the need to not seal them.. Hopefully it turns out ok. I will post a few pictures when I finish the first. I think im going to try a box car first and see how it turns out..

And ha ha ha on the roadhouse
 

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Discussion Starter #250 (Edited)
Did a little painting today. The kiln tube turned out well with the chalks. So much so, that now I have to weather the whole factory. Edit: actually I have decided that I will attempt to replicate splattering around the kiln tube holes, if i can. Or, I may leave it for now and just admire how well that turned out. Not quite sure as of yet.



Hopefully I won't ruin it..


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Discussion Starter #253
Thanks Michael for the encouraging words.. It's a work in progress..

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Discussion Starter #255
Hey Traction!

Thanks much to you also! I still have the other 3 buildings to do, but your abs Michaels encouraging words.. Man! Awesome!

And thank you for telling me about them. They're very easy to work with. I can't believe how easy they are to work with. I can't thank you enough... Seriously! Thank you good sir!

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Discussion Starter #256 (Edited)
Well, I worked on them a bit more, and I think im satisfied with the results. I have one building left, and that is for another day.. I cannot see that building, except for the front, so I'm in no rush..

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Discussion Starter #257
Well, tried a bit more weathering. Didn't turn out how I wanted(too much grime), but at least there was an attempt.. I suppose in the process of learning this, there's going to be wins and losses.. This was a loss in my book.

I think I may try to wet a brush or towel and get some of it off. It's just to pronounced for me.


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I think it looks great. Not overdone at all.

In fact, you could add a few more rust streaks under the stair supports under the doors on the wall and not hurt anything.
 
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