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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Our long holiday in 2022 was spent in the far North of Scotland. We stopped off to break the return journey close to Carlisle at a B&B in a hamlet called Boustead Hill adjacent to the Solway Firth.

This gave me an opportunity to find out more about the Port Carlisle Branch which was built on the line of the old canal between Carlisle and Port Carlisle.

 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
After 1914 and the reintroduction of steam power on the branch, there was a short period during the later part of the First World War when the line to Port Carlisle was closed. When it reopened, the hoped for increased passenger traffic never materialised. As the 1920s wore on, the LNER decided that it would replace locomotive power on the branch with steam railcars.

The first was 'Nettle', the second, 'Flower of Yarrow'.

The Port Carlisle Railway – Part 3

Sadly, their introduction did not significantly improve the financial position and the length of the line from Drumburgh to Port Carlisle was closed in 1932. .....
 

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I never knew such a thing existed. Gazing upon a few of the passenger rakes, I wouild estimate a capacity of 240 souls. Where would so many people be traveling to and from this rather remote outpost? Presumably, agriculture and dairy would be the primary commodities? Seems like a lot of capital outlay for some place that does not produce a lot of something, like ore or minerals.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Definitely remote now-a-days, but when much transport was by sea, prior to railways arriving and when trunk routes were incomplete, there was quite a goods trade down the coast to Liverpool.
At the time of the canal the route from further south to Carlisle was usually not overland but by costal shipping, both for goods and passengers.
 
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