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I have a few on the S&Y layout. Not really into tinplate buildings but the few I have kind of blended in with the other stuff.

First up is the Lionel Factory.

Bill

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I picked up this Marx crossdock building many years ago at a Barn sale that featured real deal farm equipment for auction. No other train stuff in the barn, bid $5 and won it.

Bill

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Just picked up this American Flyer station off eBay for $10.77 (including shipping and tax) - still in transit to me. These are the seller's pics.

The lithograph walls are in fairly good condition. The roof and base will get sand blasted and new paint. I'll add some benches, people and LED lighting under the eaves ...

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The thing I like most about tinplate buildings, you can easily replicate the design onto a TIFF, or JPG files, Print them to cardstock or paper, the cut out 1/8" cardboard walls and roof, then glue the paper printed walls to the cardboard walls. once the glue has all dried you can coat the buildings with semi gloss lacquer. they look EXACTLY like the originals. It is also a very easy way to design your own buildings.

Here is the front wall of a train station I did. Very easy, and you can save the designs and place windows etc. onto designs of your own.
I also added a blank brick wall. Add your own whatever.


Dan
 

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The thing I like most about tinplate buildings, you can easily replicate the design onto a TIFF, or JPG files, Print them to cardstock or paper, the cut out 1/8" cardboard walls and roof, then glue the paper printed walls to the cardboard walls. once the glue has all dried you can coat the buildings with semi gloss lacquer. they look EXACTLY like the originals. It is also a very easy way to design your own buildings.

Here is the front wall of a train station I did. Very easy, and you can save the designs and place windows etc. onto designs of your own.
I also added a blank brick wall. Add your own whatever.


Dan
It occurred to me that the smaller gift boxes in my dollar store could make the perfect "frame" to attach the printouts. They're machine manufactured with perfectly straight sides and crisp corners.
 

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It occurred to me that the smaller gift boxes in my dollar store could make the perfect "frame" to attach the printouts. They're machine manufactured with perfectly straight sides and crisp corners.
You can also increase or decrease the printout size to fit any box by adding a few rows of bricks.

Dan
 

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You can also increase or decrease the printout size to fit any box by adding a few rows of bricks.

Dan
Yep, do it a lot. I was trying to distinguish from the flimsy, gift boxes you fold into shape - like for clothing gifts. The smaller, machine made boxes are precise in shape using heavy, sturdy card stock.

Your comment is apropos. You can't just enlarge or shrink to image to fit. You need to maintain a reasonable scale for the bricks (among lots of other things). So if you need more area, you need to cut and paste more bricks.

Did you know? Portland cement is named after Portland stone from the Isle of Portland, GB. Sorry Portland WA :eek:hwell:
 

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The thing I like most about tinplate buildings, you can easily replicate the design onto a TIFF, or JPG files, Print them to cardstock or paper, the cut out 1/8" cardboard walls and roof, then glue the paper printed walls to the cardboard walls. once the glue has all dried you can coat the buildings with semi gloss lacquer. they look EXACTLY like the originals. It is also a very easy way to design your own buildings.

Here is the front wall of a train station I did. Very easy, and you can save the designs and place windows etc. onto designs of your own.
I also added a blank brick wall. Add your own whatever.


Dan
Years ago I found a paper rr booklet that had cutout buildings. I applied the same principles and built them larger,
Once I repaired a roof that rusted out. Don't underestimate the copy machine.

IMG_0880.JPG 12 2008
 

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I have also made large decals of Marx building art. For example the Roof to the Glendale Depot. Once I get the tin roof stripped and smooth, I apply the decal and the roof appears as new.
It takes about 1/2 sheet of decal paper, but they don't make these roofs anymore.

I went through several PROTOTYPES of this design until I was happy with the PRODUCTION VERSION.:cheeky4:

Dan
 

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The thing I like most about tinplate buildings, you can easily replicate the design onto a TIFF, or JPG files, Print them to cardstock or paper, the cut out 1/8" cardboard walls and roof, then glue the paper printed walls to the cardboard walls. once the glue has all dried you can coat the buildings with semi gloss lacquer. they look EXACTLY like the originals. It is also a very easy way to design your own buildings.
I agree! I did just that, printed onto matte photo paper a few years ago, for a Lionel prewar transformer station. Here are my wallpaper images, and the rebuilt station ...

Cheers,

TJ
 

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