Model Train Forum banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
54 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello Again!

Another Noob question ;)

For cutting flex track can I use a regular side cutter?

I have quite a few of them...I also have a dremel I could use too but was wondering if a regular side cutter would be ok or is there something special about the model railroad ones?

Thanks!

Ron
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
890 Posts
Side cutter like we call "dikes", or diagonal cutters? Absolutely not!

If you mean rail cutters, then *maybe*... I haven't used them so I can't say, but definitely not dikes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,469 Posts
well, you can use ordinary side cutters, but they will need some cleanup to be square.. a dremel with a cut off wheel is better, or whats commonly called xuron rail nippers that do leave the cut relatively square needing little to no cleanup ..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,443 Posts
When my Dremel cut-off wheel gets too small to get a good angle of attack, I use dikes to cut the track a bit longer than needed. Then I use the Dremel to make the final cut.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
54 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I had to eBay me a Xuron
That and already have a dremel and small file should do it
I got the 2175B Track Cutter
Thanks!

Ron
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
138 Posts
Greetings all.

So, what is truly the usage difference between the Xuron 2175-B and -M versions?
I would be using them on H0 track only.

TIA
Scott
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,469 Posts
the 2175 is designed for softer metals, for half hard the model is 691, and for hard metals the model is 2193 ..
the B is designed for cutting track before you lay it while the M is designed for cutting track in place [already laid down]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,286 Posts
When my Dremel cut-off wheel gets too small to get a good angle of attack, I use dikes to cut the track a bit longer than needed. Then I use the Dremel to make the final cut.
I use this method even with a new wheel.
I may buy a right angle attachment to cut track which is already glued in place.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
258 Posts
Hello Again!

Another Noob question


For cutting flex track can I use a regular side cutter?

I have quite a few of them...I also have a dremel I could use too but was wondering if a regular side cutter would be ok or is there something special about the model railroad ones?

Thanks!

Ron
I use this it actually works well takes a little longer than the dremel but is less stuff flying around and I’ve had the dremel go rouge on me lol
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,469 Posts
the atlas track saw is pretty slow, but works for already laid down track ... normally needs very little file cleanup .. doesn't last forever, but the price is right ..:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,286 Posts
the atlas track saw is pretty slow, but works for already laid down track ... normally needs very little file cleanup .. doesn't last forever, but the price is right ..:)
Never used one, most time there is something in the way of that long saw, which is why I never tried it. Things like; dwarf signal, track shanty, shrubbery, fingers:mad:

I know, "Don't knock it till you've tried it."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,469 Posts
I do have a hand saw, one, but it's been several years since I've seen it ....
That's why I know it's kinda slow ...
 

·
Yard Master & Research
Joined
·
10,693 Posts
When my Dremel cut-off wheel gets too small to get a good angle of attack, I use dikes to cut the track a bit longer than needed. Then I use the Dremel to make the final cut.
Always save the small wheels for the special jobs when you need a small slot. Use the fresh wheels for cutting.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
258 Posts
the atlas track saw is pretty slow, but works for already laid down track ... normally needs very little file cleanup .. doesn't last forever, but the price is right ..<img src="http://www.modeltrainforum.com/images/smilies/smile.gif" border="0" alt="" title="Smile" class="inlineimg" />
Never used one, most time there is something in the way of that long saw, which is why I never tried it. Things like; dwarf signal, track shanty, shrubbery, fingers<img src="http://www.modeltrainforum.com/images/smilies/mad.gif" border="0" alt="" title="Mad" class="inlineimg" />

I know, "Don't knock it till you've tried it."
I’ve only used it to cut the new track before I put it down. Never tried it with it down already.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
787 Posts
All your troubles will be over if you ebay Xuron Rail Nippers [about $7].. They are great.
When you use it make sure the flat side of the jaws is facing the rail you're keeping; concave side faces the unwanted rail..Also, we cut the rail top to bottom (railhead to foot), not side to side. Nothing to plug in/recharge/change blades/tighten the chuck..And it clips the rail off very easily... Do it !!
One tip if you don't already know: If you are going to use 2 or more 3' pieces of flex to form a curve, lay them out straight (on the floor,say), add rail joiners, plug em together and solder the joint/s letting solder ooze into the joiner/s..Why ? Because when you go to bend them on the layout you wind up with a smooth curve. If you don't the flex will form a kink where they're joined and look crappy.. Also: Line up the 2-3 flexes so that the connective plastic between the ties is on the inside of the curve. This allows the outside of the curve to spread the ties out a tad more apart than the inside of the curve as the 1:1 scale does in tighter curves.. Good luck,

PS. Toots (WVgca), Above, is right. Get a little file and smooth the clipped rail ends just a bit before joining clipped rail ends.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,286 Posts
....
One tip if you don't already know: If you are going to use 2 or more 3' pieces of flex to form a curve, lay them out straight (on the floor,say), add rail joiners, plug em together and solder the joint/s letting solder ooze into the joiner/s..Why ? Because when you go to bend them on the layout you wind up with a smooth curve. If you don't the flex will form a kink where they're joined and look crappy.. .
This is in part true, with some clarifying information.
If two 36" pieces of flex are soldered together in a straight line as described, you will need to lay (curve) the track from the center outwards. The outer rail gets shorter as you bend the curve, creating the staggered next track joint.

Now, if a third piece of flex was already soldered on with joiners in a straight line, the rails at that joint would not be able to slide in the ties due to the rail joiner hitting the tie clamps.

Now I've searched youtube for someone showing this whole process and did not find what I wanted, so..

I'm off to the layout to record a tutorial. Watch for a new thread in the HO section of the forum:smilie_daumenpos:
 

Attachments

1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top