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Discussion Starter #1
Anyone know of a good place to go to find out how to do this. I know there is a way to draw the track and which way the switches are set and the direction of the train. Here is a pic of what I have done with 8 different switches. Can't remember which is where without a diagram. What is this drawing called? Thanks Ron
 

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Control panel with indicator lights

Anyone know of a good place to go to find out how to do this. I know there is a way to draw the track and which way the switches are set and the direction of the train. Here is a pic of what I have done with 8 different switches. Can't remember which is where without a diagram. What is this drawing called? Thanks Ron
darticus;

I think what you're referring to is a track schematic diagram. This is normally drawn on a control panel. The panel schematic is a scaled down, and often simplified, representation of the actual track layout.
The control panel can have toggle, or slide, electrical switches located where the eight turnouts (track switches) are on the layout. The position of the electric switch's handle indicates the direction the turnout is set for. Some people go further and mount small indicator lights next to each electrical switch. (NOTE: This is why we refer to track switches as turnouts. It saves having to state which type of switch you are referring to every time.)
The light next to the main line comes on when the turnout is set for the main. The light for the siding/diverging track comes on when the turnout is set for the siding.
With the type of turnouts you are using, you would have to attach some form of tiny electrical switch to the turnout, which would change state when the turnout was thrown. This is a challenge in any scale, and would be extremely difficult in Z-scale. Another way to operate the lights would be to wire them to the toggle/slide switch. This would actually only indicate which way the toggle switch is thrown; not necessarily which route the turnout is set for. Again, with the type of turnouts you're using, only a brief (1-2 second) burst of power is used to throw the turnout. Any longer application of power can burnout the coils inside the turnout. For this reason a momentary push-button needs to be wired into the circuit, along with those toggle switches. To throw a turnout, you would set the appropriate toggle switch to the route you want the train to go, and then push the button quickly.
Your turnouts probably came with some type of control button for each turnout. You can use these, instead of toggles, and a push-button. They perform the functions of both. Sometimes these controls are too bulky to fit on a track schematic diagram. Another way is to put numbers, letters, colors, or some other symbols, on the diagram, and set up all the controls of to one side. Then, by looking at the diagram, you would see that you need to throw turnout #4. Looking over at the string of controls, you would operate control #4.
You might want to get a copy of the book, "Introduction to Model Railroading" by Jeff Wilson. It covers wiring, and lots of other useful model railroad topics in simple text, and many color photos. You can order one from https://kalmbachhobbystore.com/products/books
good luck;

Traction Fan:smilie_daumenpos:
 

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Discussion Starter #3
darticus;

I think what you're referring to is a track schematic diagram. This is normally drawn on a control panel. The panel schematic is a scaled down, and often simplified, representation of the actual track layout.
The control panel can have toggle, or slide, electrical switches located where the eight turnouts (track switches) are on the layout. The position of the electric switch's handle indicates the direction the turnout is set for. Some people go further and mount small indicator lights next to each electrical switch. (NOTE: This is why we refer to track switches as turnouts. It saves having to state which type of switch you are referring to every time.)
The light next to the main line comes on when the turnout is set for the main. The light for the siding/diverging track comes on when the turnout is set for the siding.
With the type of turnouts you are using, you would have to attach some form of tiny electrical switch to the turnout, which would change state when the turnout was thrown. This is a challenge in any scale, and would be extremely difficult in Z-scale. Another way to operate the lights would be to wire them to the toggle/slide switch. This would actually only indicate which way the toggle switch is thrown; not necessarily which route the turnout is set for. Again, with the type of turnouts you're using, only a brief (1-2 second) burst of power is used to throw the turnout. Any longer application of power can burnout the coils inside the turnout. For this reason a momentary push-button needs to be wired into the circuit, along with those toggle switches. To throw a turnout, you would set the appropriate toggle switch to the route you want the train to go, and then push the button quickly.
Your turnouts probably came with some type of control button for each turnout. You can use these, instead of toggles, and a push-button. They perform the functions of both. Sometimes these controls are too bulky to fit on a track schematic diagram. Another way is to put numbers, letters, colors, or some other symbols, on the diagram, and set up all the controls of to one side. Then, by looking at the diagram, you would see that you need to throw turnout #4. Looking over at the string of controls, you would operate control #4.
You might want to get a copy of the book, "Introduction to Model Railroading" by Jeff Wilson. It covers wiring, and lots of other useful model railroad topics in simple text, and many color photos. You can order one from https://kalmbachhobbystore.com/products/books
good luck;

Traction Fan:smilie_daumenpos:
FANTASTIC INFO! This is just what I needed! Now where to get lighted momentary switches? I have the marklin switch boxes the extension packs came with and a drawing showing 8-1. I can number the switch boxes 8-1 so I can get it right which which switch is which. see pics any more suggestions would be great! Thanks Ron
 

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I second the suggestion to use the 751D units.

IMG_6725.JPG

I built the panel from mdf. Drew the schematic with a felt marker. I omitted the indicator LEDs on this version to keep it simple. My first version I found them a bit distracting to be honest.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks All
and thanks for this nice control panel pic. This gives me ideas.
I think maybe I should stay with the Marklin push buttons and the drawing I made unless someone can tell me how to make a better drawing. I do like the lights on the control panel but maybe not now. Thanks again Ron
 

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Indicator lights?

Thanks All
and thanks for this nice control panel pic. This gives me ideas.
I think maybe I should stay with the Marklin push buttons and the drawing I made unless someone can tell me how to make a better drawing. I do like the lights on the control panel but maybe not now. Thanks again Ron
Ron;

You are wise to stick with your Marklin controls, at least for now. Looking at the photo of those controls, I see two black dots between the red and green buttons. Are those lights? If so, you don't need to rig any other lights unless you just can't live without them, and are willing to do all the work they would require. You asked about lighted, momentary switches. I have some called "Super buttons." They are very small, momentary, push buttons; that have a light inside each button. They are made specifically for control panels, and come in different colors. The idea is that you install one button (say a green one) right on the line that represents the main track. A second button would be installed on the line for the siding. (Let's have this one be yellow.)
When you wanted the train to go on the siding you would push the button for that route. It would set the turnout to the siding and light up yellow. When you had finished dropping off a car on the siding, you would back the train out onto the main, and push the other button. It would set the turnout to the main track, and light up green. A glance would tell you which way each turnout was set. Nice, but would it be worth the effort to you?
This forum is a great information source. You get the benefit of the collective experience of many people. However it shouldn't necessarily be your only resource. A good book, like the one I recommended to you last time, is available to you at any time. You don't have to wait for someone to answer your questions. The answers are likely right there in print and photos. For instance you wanted to know how to build, and wire a control panel. Chapter seven of "Introduction to Model Railroading" covers just that. It tells you about basic electricity as it relates to model railroading, and shows two ways to build a panel. It also discusses DC and DCC control systems and other hobby electric items. There are other chapters covering planing, tools, benchwork, track, model structures, scenery, locomotives, rolling stock (cars) , painting, and weathering.
If you have not already ordered the book, I recommend you do so. It will be a big help to you. Of course feel free to ask questions here on the forum too. We will do all we can to help.

regards;

Traction Fan:smilie_daumenpos:
 

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Based on your drawing, I'd consider controlling turnouts 1&2 with one switch. Same with 5&6. Reason being if you want turnout #1 to diverge, #2 needs to diverge too. No sense using 2 switches in these cases.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Ron;

You are wise to stick with your Marklin controls, at least for now. Looking at the photo of those controls, I see two black dots between the red and green buttons. Are those lights? If so, you don't need to rig any other lights unless you just can't live without them, and are willing to do all the work they would require. You asked about lighted, momentary switches. I have some called "Super buttons." They are very small, momentary, push buttons; that have a light inside each button. They are made specifically for control panels, and come in different colors. The idea is that you install one button (say a green one) right on the line that represents the main track. A second button would be installed on the line for the siding. (Let's have this one be yellow.)
When you wanted the train to go on the siding you would push the button for that route. It would set the turnout to the siding and light up yellow. When you had finished dropping off a car on the siding, you would back the train out onto the main, and push the other button. It would set the turnout to the main track, and light up green. A glance would tell you which way each turnout was set. Nice, but would it be worth the effort to you?
This forum is a great information source. You get the benefit of the collective experience of many people. However it shouldn't necessarily be your only resource. A good book, like the one I recommended to you last time, is available to you at any time. You don't have to wait for someone to answer your questions. The answers are likely right there in print and photos. For instance you wanted to know how to build, and wire a control panel. Chapter seven of "Introduction to Model Railroading" covers just that. It tells you about basic electricity as it relates to model railroading, and shows two ways to build a panel. It also discusses DC and DCC control systems and other hobby electric items. There are other chapters covering planing, tools, benchwork, track, model structures, scenery, locomotives, rolling stock (cars) , painting, and weathering.
If you have not already ordered the book, I recommend you do so. It will be a big help to you. Of course feel free to ask questions here on the forum too. We will do all we can to help.

regards;

Traction Fan:smilie_daumenpos:
Thanks again
The two dots are just dots no lights. I don't know what they aer for. Thanks for all that info and the book recommendation. I'm sure all will help. Thanks Ron
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
Based on your drawing, I'd consider controlling turnouts 1&2 with one switch. Same with 5&6. Reason being if you want turnout #1 to diverge, #2 needs to diverge too. No sense using 2 switches in these cases.
I thank you for that info. I will wire 1 and 2 and 5 and 6 the way you said as I didn't know to do this. If you see other wiring changes that I should do please let me know.
Just wondered if combining 1 and 2 or 5 and 6 would be a problem if I was running two trains in two different loops either in the same direction or in different direction using insulators. Thanks Ron
 

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I wouid think that if your switches are set for the mains you would have no problem. However when you set them to diverge you could have a problem depending on the direction your trains are going. You would have to test run to see what's what.
 

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Traction Fan

Your description of the momentary lighted panel
push buttons interests me. Sounds like a good
substitute for the Stapleton 751D. Can you give us
a link to them?

Don
 

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Superbuttons

Traction Fan

Your description of the momentary lighted panel
push buttons interests me. Sounds like a good
substitute for the Stapleton 751D. Can you give us
a link to them?

Don
Don;
I acquired my super super buttons 2nd hand long ago. Other that the product's brand name of "Super Buttons" I don't have any info on how to get some. A search of Walthers might find them. I'm not familiar with the Stapleton 751D, except by mentions on the forum. Since I don't know its capabilities, I can't know if super buttons would be a viable substitute.
The buttons are just that, normally open push buttons. They have a light inside the button and the top part, above the panel surface, is smaller than the red & black Radio Shack buttons many have used on control panels.
I don't think these things have any memory, or latching capability. They're just little, lighted buttons.

regards;

Traction Fan:smilie_daumenpos:
 

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TF

With apologies to the OP for hijacking his
thread, another question:

Are you saying the momentary push super buttons
have a light indicating Straight or Divert? How
does it stay on?

The 751D, Is a toggle switch available for twin coil or Tortoise
type motors. For twin coil it has connections for
panel lights and has it's own cap discharge unit.

Don
 

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Super buttons

TF

With apologies to the OP for hijacking his
thread, another question:

Are you saying the momentary push super buttons
have a light indicating Straight or Divert? How
does it stay on?

The 751D, Is a toggle switch available for twin coil or Tortoise
type motors. For twin coil it has connections for
panel lights and has it's own cap discharge unit.

Don
Don;

I checked one out today. It is just a really small, normally open, push button; with a light inside the button. There are three wires coming from it. One is common to both the button, and the lamp. The second is power input for the lamp (9-12v probably incandescent). The third is the open contact of the push button. When you apply power to the lamp, and common, wires, the top of the button lights up. The buttons have replaceable, different colored, top lenses. When the button is pushed, the common and open button contact wires connect. There is no internal latch circuitry. If you want the light to stay on, that would have to depend on contacts in the switch machine. Like any other push button setup, you would need two buttons per turnout.One for main route, and one for the diverging route.
In short, it's just a push button with an internal light.

Traction Fan:smilie_daumenpos:
 
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