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I'm not sure if this topic belongs in here but it seems as good a place as any, I guess.

I'm interested in how all you experienced modelers weather your trains. Can you give us newbies a description of the process involved? Alot of the books I've read mention using pastels and chalk...powdery things like that. I know there's something else that gets sprayed on afterwards to make the engines and cars "handlable" but I don't know what it's called. I think it's some kind of laquer-type stuff but it doesn't show on the finished project.

Does any of this sound familiar?
 

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I usually do things with chalks. See below, this took about 15 minutes with some cheap chalks from the art store and a stiff bristled brush:



Once you are satisfied with the weathering, you can 'seal' the chalk with a product called Testor's Dullcote, available at most hobby and craft shops. One tip - the dullcote liquid is a spray can and works better slightly warm, so immerse the whole can in some warm water before using it, it should give a finer spray.

More experienced modelers sometimes use an airbrush as well to simulate diesel exhaust buildup and other effects like spilled oil and general light rusting effects. I tried it on some freight cars, check out below:

 

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A set of artists chalks - make sure you go to decent art supply store - should be around $10. Get some stiff bristled brushes and you will be on your way.

I will be demanding pics!!
I need to get some flat water based paints also. All I have now are semi gloss and oil paints. I made a really shiney mountain that needs to be repainted. :retard: :lol_hitting:
 
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