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Before this thread ages into oblivion, I have a question that might be a little on the stupid side. My son built a Lego model of a Swiss Crocodile locomotive (in addition to the N gauge layout we are working on together, he has a Lego city and layout he is working on a lot). I was thinking I might surprise him soon and found a N gauge German Crocodile loco (found the Swiss one in HO but gold plated and a list price of $1,500 - out of my price range even if it were the right size).

So, my question is what do I need to run that on my layout besides some European cars for it. I am assuming that the couplers are different and I would need matching couplers to form a train, right? The loco is already DCC and I am assuming the standards for that work the same too. But other than possibly looking out of place on my layout with all the American transition era stuff, is there anything else that would be needed to make it work?

Sorry for tagging onto this thread, but I figured it was sort of related and you would know, even if the gauges and countries were different.
 

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You should need nothing else. European equipment runs quite nicely on American layouts. I can't tell you anything about coupler compatibility in N scale. I have HO/HOm.
 

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You should need nothing else. European equipment runs quite nicely on American layouts. I can't tell you anything about coupler compatibility in N scale. I have HO/HOm.
Thanks. I have decided to avoid the coupler question by getting him some German cars to go with the loco.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
Why are UK freight cars (wagons) of "Era 3" (1923-1947) so short?

Passenger cars range from 40'-63', yet the freight wagons are little stubby things?
 

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You'd have to ask here, as I know nothing about British Rail.

RMweb
 

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This is what I could find with a real quick search.....if more time was spent searching, I would imagine a better answer could be found....but I believe it’s due to the lower per axle tonnage rating in Britain.....they could only have smaller/shorter cars because of that.....

The rolling stock differed on either side of the Atlantic, too: although British goods wagons, including hopper, tank, and freight cars, chiefly retained nineteenth-century short four-wheeled form well into the 1970s (and some are still in use), the four-wheeler died out in Americas well before the twentieth century. Again, relatively inferior trackage led to engineering innovation: Americans found themselves forced to develop swivelling wheel sets (freight trucks) that could better navigate curves and changing grades, and also spread the weight out over the extra axles.
 

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Discussion Starter #27
But... the passenger cars had two-axle trucks, so it's not like they weren't aware of that "engineering innovation" in the UK. While I've never been to the UK, I'm guessing there are curves and grades there also.
 

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I think the passenger cars had 2 axle trucks because they gave a smoother ride to the travellers, and unlike North America, rail operations in the UK were always concentrated on passenger traffic, not freight.....

As for curves and grades......they built their railways with a minimum of grades, whereas N. America had to conquer large mountain ranges, and had to have bigger grades.....
 

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Discussion Starter #29
City of Edinburgh

The second loco from across the pond arrived today.

553777


Also with loose parts.
553778


Where it's supposed to be. No biggie, I'll glue it back on.
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Overall pretty nice details.

I don't know if you can tell in the last pic, but that rear bogie isn't. It's just for looks. It's rigid and rides ever so slightly above the rails... and the wheels don't have flanges.

Now the decoder just needs to get here.
 

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Very nice Stumpy! I can't wait to see a video of it on your layout.

That locomotive is beautiful.
 
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Discussion Starter #31
The Duchess arrived today,

But there is 😕
Well, Amazon UK allowed me $20 for shipping back across the pond. It was going to cost ~ $55, which means the price of the loco just went up $35. So I decided to fix it. (Still have until March 4 to return it if it doesn't work out.)

Looks rough on the bottom. But I wasn't worried about pretty. I wanted plenty of CA on it, but not in the screw hole.

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On the top side: I cut a piece of styrene (with a hole just a skosh bigger than the screw hole) to span/cover the entire area for reinforcement. My hope is that I don't have to glue the screw in.

553849
 

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What happened? I missed the part where you explained the problem!
 

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That sucks. I hope they QC'd this before it left and the gorillas at Royal Mail were the responsible ones.

Was it packed well?
 

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Discussion Starter #35
It was packed well. No damage to the shipping box or the product packaging. The way the Hornby models are packaged, I don't see how it could have happened in the box... unless the box was destroyed... or dropped from ten stories up.
 

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PIKO, TRIX, and Roco use that same type of packaging. Clam-shell opening for the plastic surround. Impossible for the model to move in there.
 

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Why are UK freight cars (wagons) of "Era 3" (1923-1947) so short?

Passenger cars range from 40'-63', yet the freight wagons are little stubby things?
A lot of the coal mines and mineral quarries developed during the horse-drawn period before steam. The coal and similar wagons evolved from those early horse-powered mines. The space was limited and the clearances smaller than North America. A loaded 40ft boxcar probably would have demolished some of those lighter British branch lines.
For decades British freight wagons were only manually braked with levers and retaining pins. The larger cars and passenger coaches had vacuum brakes. British Railway Goods Rolling Stock Design Introduction
 

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Discussion Starter #38
The decoders arrived for the Duchess and the CoE.

The Duchess continues to be a PITA. The "hanger" for the front bogie is bent so the wheels do not sit on the rails (remember the invisible dog leash?), so I have to take the assembly off and get out the sledge hammer.

🤬
 

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Discussion Starter #39
Turns out the hanger wasn't woppy-jaw'd. It wasn't skroo'd in. Made in China.

Still needed a little adjustment tho.

Now I have to do the PECO turnout mod to EVERY turnout on the layout.

Here's a vid of her majesty not having to traverse any turnouts. Sound is good, I think.

 

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It does sound good. Doesn't anyone besides the Germans and Austrians make anything in their own countries anymore??? Jeez.
 
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