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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Yesterday, I saw a news report on CBS that was talking about protecting infants against the Covid 19. Infants should not be masked, so they said for parents or care givers to carry the infant close to the body, with the baby facing inward. Seems to be a reasonable idea. Okay.

Then they showed an infant in a stroller or other type of pram. They showed, and advised to cover the vehicle opening with mosquito netting. MOSQUITO NETTING! What the hell is that going to do? Keep infected mosquitos from getting to the kid? 'Cause it sure is NOT going to protect the child from the virus, unless the virus is a quarter inch in diameter.

Really, is anyone of intelligence watching this stuff? Are there any editors working for this news service that have any common sense? MOSQUITO NETTING to protect from a virus that is probably .125 microns in diameter (average size). Human hair is approximately 50 microns in diameter, so this stuff is really small.

Every day, it just gets more bizarre.
 

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Better then nothing? Since you can't use a mask?
What else can you do?
Or, just keep the kid HOME, till he is of age to wear a mask. :rolleyes:
Just ask Alice? :)
 

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Then they showed an infant in a stroller or other type of pram. They showed, and advised to cover the vehicle opening with mosquito netting. MOSQUITO NETTING! What the hell is that going to do? Keep infected mosquitos from getting to the kid? 'Cause it sure is NOT going to protect the child from the virus, unless the virus is a quarter inch in diameter.
...

Every day, it just gets more bizarre.
I didn't see that, nor do I know it's source. But on the net, I see articles with purport solutions that are dead wrong, opposite of what you should do. It's writers that need to post an article and they just dream up solutions.

For example; I saw one that said don;t rake up your fall leaves. Instead mulch them into the lawn where they'll decompose and feed nutrients to the grass through the winter. Common sense, right?

That's the absolute worst thing you can do to your lawn. As the leaves decompose, they create an acidic environment. Grass loves an alkaline environment. That's why we put lime on the lawn. And in my yard, the amount of leaves would suffocate the grass even if mulched. Do you ever see grass growing on a forest floor?
 

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To respond to the grass question.... it is not because of the leaves on the forest floor that won’t let the grass grow... it’s more because of the lack of sunlight & moisture... the canopy stops the sun, and the rain from getting there when the leave are on. Ever notice in the spring the floor looks very green , but by July is thin & not a lot there other then vegetation that can handle the lack of both? I say this because as a farmer our best pasture lots where between wooded lots where leaves would lay & cover our grasses in the fall. We would move our cattle to them in June-July & the grass would be just amazing! We would never have to supplement them until August! That was due to the rains not coming in. It would just dry up.

I’m sure your lawn is a bit different, but I just wanted to point out that your statement was a bit off on the forest floor...


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Discussion Starter #6
Go ask Alice, I think she'll know.
 
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Better then nothing? Since you can't use a mask?
What else can you do?
Or, just keep the kid HOME, till he is of age to wear a mask. :rolleyes:
Just ask Alice? :)
It's really not better than nothing. It's no different at all in virus protection.

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To respond to the grass question.... it is not because of the leaves on the forest floor that won’t let the grass grow... it’s more because of the lack of sunlight & moisture... the canopy stops the sun, and the rain from getting there when the leave are on. Ever notice in the spring the floor looks very green , but by July is thin & not a lot there other then vegetation that can handle the lack of both? I say this because as a farmer our best pasture lots where between wooded lots where leaves would lay & cover our grasses in the fall. We would move our cattle to them in June-July & the grass would be just amazing! We would never have to supplement them until August! That was due to the rains not coming in. It would just dry up.

I’m sure your lawn is a bit different, but I just wanted to point out that your statement was a bit off on the forest floor...


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Yes, I'm familiar. Nothing would grow in the rear section of my yard (not even weeds) until I shaded a third of a huge maple. At first, I though the dirt was contaminated. And pine needles are so acidic no lawn can grow under a pine even with light.

I'd like more details about your pasture lots. Were the leaves still there when you moved the cattle in for grazing? Did they cover the grass completely. What part of the country? And pasture grasses are very hardy compared to lawn grasses.
 

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It's really not better than nothing. It's no different at all in virus protection.

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But the dangerous mosquito won't get to the baby. :D
 

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If a bacteria were the size of a basketball, the average virus is the size of a ping-pong ball. Masks do absolutely nothing to stop the spread of a virus, unless you are wearing a M95 mask. They do, however, increase your blood CO2 levels and decrease your blood oxygen levels.
 

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"They do, however, increase your blood CO2 levels and decrease your blood oxygen levels."
I would be willing to consider this, fly, if you included a pointer to any medical studies??
 

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I didn't see that, nor do I know it's source. But on the net, I see articles with purport solutions that are dead wrong, opposite of what you should do. It's writers that need to post an article and they just dream up solutions.

For example; I saw one that said don;t rake up your fall leaves. Instead mulch them into the lawn where they'll decompose and feed nutrients to the grass through the winter. Common sense, right?

That's the absolute worst thing you can do to your lawn. As the leaves decompose, they create an acidic environment. Grass loves an alkaline environment. That's why we put lime on the lawn. And in my yard, the amount of leaves would suffocate the grass even if mulched. Do you ever see grass growing on a forest floor?
Decomposing leaves do not alter the pH of the soil to any appreciable degree, either in lawns or beds. Any effect they may have is short term and only in the top inch or two of soil.
It’s a common gardening myth.

Soil has a natural sbility to maintain a certain pH value. It’s called buffering capacity. It varies depending on the soil type, texture and structure.
It’s actually pretty difficult to alter the pH of soil in a short period of time without using either lime ( to raise pH) or Aluminum Sulfate (to lower pH).

Addition of acid forming organic materials helps over time, but if you wanted to change a pinkish blooming Hydrangea to pure blue you would use an application of Aluminum Sulfate in late winter. If applied in properly in the right amount you should have a beautiful blue Hydranges that summer.
If you try to change it by incorporating leaves, you will be waiting quite a while.
 

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I applied some fertilizer for acid loving plants to mine this spring.
The ones in the front corner are supposed to be blue all the time it turned some of them purple, which I don't mind.
The other 2 plants used to be white and pink, the fertilizer made some blue. These blooms are weeks old now, starting to wilt.
I thought feeding them in autumn was frowned upon?
I will have to try that this year, I like mostly all Blue Hydrangeas.

My grass grows fairly well, I been cutting it with a mulching mower for 22 years now. In the autumn when the leaves fall I just mow them over with the mower.
If it is too many, I suck them up with my leave blower which mulches them up into a bag. I put them in my mulch pile.
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Decomposing leaves do not alter the pH of the soil to any appreciable degree, either in lawns or beds. Any effect they may have is short term and only in the top inch or two of soil.
It’s a common gardening myth.

Soil has a natural sbility to maintain a certain pH value. It’s called buffering capacity. It varies depending on the soil type, texture and structure.
It’s actually pretty difficult to alter the pH of soil in a short period of time without using either lime ( to raise pH) or Aluminum Sulfate (to lower pH).

Addition of acid forming organic materials helps over time, but if you wanted to change a pinkish blooming Hydrangea to pure blue you would use an application of Aluminum Sulfate in late winter. If applied in properly in the right amount you should have a beautiful blue Hydranges that summer.
If you try to change it by incorporating leaves, you will be waiting quite a while.
This says spring is the best, also only the big leaf hydrangeas can benefit from that.
Says to apply it in the spring multiple times.
My first one in the picture is a small leaf hydrangea, the acid fertilizer turned some purple.
The fertilizer I used had the Aluminum Sulfate in it.

How did we get from Mosquito netting to flowers? ha ha ha :D
 

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If a bacteria were the size of a basketball, the average virus is the size of a ping-pong ball. Masks do absolutely nothing to stop the spread of a virus, unless you are wearing a M95 mask. They do, however, increase your blood CO2 levels and decrease your blood oxygen levels.
Interesting.....that would explain why right-wing nut bars won’t wear a mask....they can’t afford to get even less oxygen going to their brains..... ;)
 

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Growing anything under a heavy tree canopy is difficult. We have 12ea. 40 year Pin Oak trees on the property. We could not get grass to grow properly under the canopy. We had these Oaks trimmed out last year. Thinning the canopy correctly helped some. The Arborist who trimmed the Oaks informed me that the Pin Oaks were sucking up most all of the ground moisture and the fallen leaves could make the ground acidic. We also have a 30 year old Walnut tree that the fallen leaves can affect the ground under it for growing. A maple tree will suck the ground of moisture as well and their roots are at ground level to boot.
 

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This says spring is the best, also only the big leaf hydrangeas can benefit from that.
Says to apply it in the spring multiple times.
My first one in the picture is a small leaf hydrangea, the acid fertilizer turned some purple.
The fertilizer I used had the Aluminum Sulfate in it.

How did we get from Mosquito netting to flowers? ha ha ha :D
One application of granular in late winter, right before a snow, has always worked for me. Been doing it for over 50 years professionally.
By spring, buds are already forming.
I’ve even put it on top of light snow cover. You never want to put it on dry plants. Always need moisture.
 

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One application of granular in late winter, right before a snow, has always worked for me. Been doing it for over 50 years professionally.
By spring, buds are already forming.
I’ve even put it on top of light snow cover. You never want to put it on dry plants. Always need moisture.
And just to clarify: Ed, the horticultural aspect of your reference is fine. The reason we did this in early winter was because there was little else going on maintenance wise and usually too wet to plant. In early to mid-spring there is 100 other things to do and guaranteed acidifying hydrangeas is going to be skipped.
As for the topic, yep, quite a shift. I think someone was suggesting that some author thought mosquito netting would stop Covid. I have to think the netting would be to keep mosquitos from biting the infants. They can transmit some nasty stuff. Not sure if they know if they can transmit Covid yet or not.
 

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And just to clarify: Ed, the horticultural aspect of your reference is fine. The reason we did this in early winter was because there was little else going on maintenance wise and usually too wet to plant. In early to mid-spring there is 100 other things to do and guaranteed acidifying hydrangeas is going to be skipped.
As for the topic, yep, quite a shift. I think someone was suggesting that some author thought mosquito netting would stop Covid. I have to think the netting would be to keep mosquitos from biting the infants. They can transmit some nasty stuff. Not sure if they know if they can transmit Covid yet or not.
I forgot to look where your at. Climate is a lot different down yonder then up here.
I am happy the way mine came out but I only fed them the one time.
Next year I will try to feed them a few more times.
But the stuff I used does have the aluminum sulfate in it, I just never read the tag.
I do like the blue better, but the mixture is nice too.
 
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