Model Train Forum banner

1 - 20 of 37 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,178 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD-6) had an explosion and fire today in San Diego. John probably recognizes the name since the last ship (CV-31) with the name was in the same class as the ship he served on (USS Shangri-La). LHD-6 is the fifth navy ship with the name. The first one was named by John Paul Jones.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,178 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Still burning today. Seems like they are using an abundance of caution. If it happened at sea, I bet the damage control teams would have taken care of it in short order. I guess they are not allowed to use AFFF in port.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
777 Posts
They are saying that the hull has been so hot for so long that it is losing stuctural integrity and will likely not be salvageable.
It's about making me sick. We may need ALL those vessels to deal with China.

"Multiple fires have broken out in U.S. Navy ships undergoing maintenance over the past several months, and, rather than make changes, the U.S. Navy seems to have chosen to ignore the problem, happier to gloat and point fingers as shipyard fires nearly sank Russia’s Admiral Kuznetsov in 2019 and one of China’s new Type 075 big-deck amphibious assault ships earlier this year. The U.S. Navy’s failure to act—even after several warnings and close calls—is inexplicable and inexcusable. "

More on forbes.com (Link) Quite revealing.

Captain Thoroman CO LHD-6
Captain Eastham CO HSC-3
Rear Admiral Sobek Cmdr ESG-3
Acting SecNav James McPherson
All or some should soon be due for a change in scenery, IMO.


 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,913 Posts
It's being reported that the ship's fire suppression system was shut down for maintenance while in port. I don't know if that's standard practice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,435 Posts
It's being reported that the ship's fire suppression system was shut down for maintenance while in port. I don't know if that's standard practice.
I'd think it'd be pretty common to shut systems down during overhaul. I'd think those systems would be undergoing modernization along with other work. Hopefully the Navy is learning lessons on fire prevention and shipboard firefighting.

What I find interesting is the use of helicopter water drop buckets!! (See video in "StackPath" link below). Second link has more info. Apparently the fire has climbed to topside.


 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,178 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
It'll be interesting to find out how that happened, sadly the Shangri-La is razor blades now I suspect. :)
The Naval Vessel Register doesn’t have a whole lot of info on CVS-38. Just says it was commissioned on 9/15/44, decommissioned on 7/30/71 and disposed of by MARAD exchange.

Wikipedia has a whole lot more. Sold for scrap in 1988.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,626 Posts
They are saying that the hull has been so hot for so long that it is losing stuctural integrity and will likely not be salvageable.
It's about making me sick. We may need ALL those vessels to deal with China.

"Multiple fires have broken out in U.S. Navy ships undergoing maintenance over the past several months, and, rather than make changes, the U.S. Navy seems to have chosen to ignore the problem, happier to gloat and point fingers as shipyard fires nearly sank Russia’s Admiral Kuznetsov in 2019 and one of China’s new Type 075 big-deck amphibious assault ships earlier this year. The U.S. Navy’s failure to act—even after several warnings and close calls—is inexplicable and inexcusable. "

More on forbes.com (Link) Quite revealing.

Captain Thoroman CO LHD-6
Captain Eastham CO HSC-3
Rear Admiral Sobek Cmdr ESG-3
Acting SecNav James McPherson
All or some should soon be due for a change in scenery, IMO.


Interesting article, but, I wouldn't call it informative or even informed reporting. It's an editorial rant from a reporter who claims to know better, but obviously doesn't. This guy obviously has an axe to grind. This isn't the first grossly inaccurate piece I've seen from him either. He claims to do "special interest stories", which seems to be a code for creating major issues out of minor problems for the sake of polishing his brand.

In point of fact, fires in vessels in shipyards happen all the time; it's not a new problem, and it's also not a serious one. I guess the author seems to think that if there are enough small incidents, then there must be a big one out there just waiting to happen. Fact is, the last time a Navy vessel was seriously damaged in a shipyard fire was USS MIAMI in May, 2012, and that one turned out to be deliberately started. Since we don't know what caused this fire, it's really too soon to say that this was a preventable event. It was certainly exacerbated by the fact that it was in a maintenance period, with the shipboard firefighting systems shut down, most of the watertight doors (which would be used to contain the fire) were blocked open with power lines, hoses, and ventilation ducts, and there was only a skeleton crew onboard -160 out of 1000).

I would also note that while you can use AFFF in port, it is a foam firefighting agent that is designed to fight fuel oil fires (which this isn't), and isn't very effective on a Class A fire, which this is.

Anything else you'd like to know about shipboard firefighting, just ask. Not only was I the OIC (Officer in Charge) of the Atlantic Fleet's best small deck aviation firefighting unit from 1989 to 1992, I was also in charge of one of the firefighting teams put onboard USS CONYNGHAM (DDG-17) by USS NORMANDY (CG-60) in May1990. I've done it for real.

While it's likely the ship's CO will lose his job over this, it's not certain. The ship was undergoing maintenance being performed by a civilian firm; and again, we don't know whether there were any procedural violations which led to the fire (inadequate firewatches, perhaps). It's also tough to indict the entire Chain of Command as well, although the Navy's civilian leaders have been more politically reliable than competent in recent years, and certainly the Navy's maintenance accounts have been criminally underfunded.
 
  • Like
Reactions: The USRA Guy

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,178 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
Will be interesting to learn how it started and what type of fuel kept it going. Due to the size of the fire, I had assumed that aviation fuel was at least part of the problem. What little I have read said it started in a cargo hold and that cables through hatches helped it spread.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,626 Posts
From what I have read, it started in the well deck. When the ship is at sea, the well deck can be flooded and used to launch small craft or LCACs (Landing Craft, Air Cushion). In a maintenance period, it was likely being used as an auxiliary storage area. While there is going to be some amount of grease and oil just about everywhere on a ship like this, the fuel oil and AVGAS tanks were sealed and therefore protected from the fire.

Kne of thi big problems they will be facing is the heat. When we boarded the CONYNGHAM, we had to get three hoses in action and spent about 10 minutes (it seemed like hours) cooling the superstructure before we could even get up on it for the first few minutes, the water fog didn't even touch the metal of the ship -- it evaporated before it hit. One team continued to pour water on it to keep it cool, while the other two teams went onto the superstructure, cut two holes in the deck, and poured water into the burning space just to cool things down. After about an hour, we were able to send a hose team into the ship from either side and start actually fighting the fire.
 
1 - 20 of 37 Posts
Top