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It's about making me sick. We may need ALL those vessels to deal with China.
China will have to wait, until the US Navy can figure out how to put out a fire on one of their ships first.....;)
 

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China will have to wait, until the US Navy can figure out how to put out a fire on one of their ships first.....;)
Hey, I don't want to antagonize anyone with that! I am quite sure that we KNOW HOW. But the reasons that it did not happen fall on the leadership, in my view. A fire on board during maintenance operations is hardly an unanticipated occurrence. They are frugal with the details, other than that fire suppression systems were disabled. It seems that, in that event, backup procedures would be in place, including available trained firefighters, hoses, pumps, breathers, fire suits, etc, etc. It is an aircraft carrier, after all. Maybe the fire/explosion really was that overwhelming that the DC parties had to withdraw. But from the little we have been able to read, it was deemed too dangerous to press the issue. Hindsight is 20/20, as they say. We'll see what else may come about later. I'm sure that I wouldn't want to be in there fighting that blaze.
 

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The only shipboard fire fighting experience I have is in Navy boot camp. They had an old hull that they had burning oil under all the deck grills and you got to go inside and put it out. Since this was in the 60's, the Navy didn't believe in all the fancy equipment they have now, you just had a rubber suit and a face shield! That was enough for me, I'm glad I never had to experience that for real!

When I was on the Shangri La, we had a training crash of an F8 Crusader on deck off the coast of Florida. I got to watch them fight that fire on the PLAT TV monitor in the comfort of the TV Studio. There was a lot of fire, but they had it out in about five minutes.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
"She", I meant to say, oops...
She isn’t an aircraft carrier either. It does carry helicopters, but it’s an amphib. LHD stands for landing helicopter dock. Aircraft carriers have hull designations that start with CV.
 

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Oohh, ya got me!
But, "The primary mission of Bonhomme Richard is to embark, deploy and land elements of a Marine landing force in amphibious assault operations by helicopter, landing craft and amphibious vehicle, and if needed, to act as a light aircraft carrier. "
She can carry 20 F-35B or Harrier II, in addition to her Ospreys and helos. So, she is not a CV, you are correct, but she has an 840 foot flight deck (15 feet longer than The Big E :D), and carries fixed wing aircraft, so semantics not withstanding I can call the lady an aircraft carrier, don't ya think? I think she does lack a catapult and arresting gear. Really, beside the point.
 

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Doesn't surprise me in the least. A high volume of low velocity water fog does a great job of cooling things down to the point where it can be tolerated. A couple of the guys did melt the soles of their boondockers, though.

Sorry, that was in reply to big dodgetrains post #20, which I thought I quoted. For some reason, it did'nt show me the other posts until I posted my reply?
 

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Yard maintenance periods are a nightmare. The ship is torn up (many of the crew live there), you work harder than you do at sea often away from home port and your family, everyone is dirty and sweaty, a bunch of complete strangers are given cutting and welding torches and they cut and weld all over the ship. We had one fire start three decks down from the welder. Another in a tank the fire watch couldn't see. Cables run through every door on the ship so isolating the smoke is impossible. Chances are the Bonhomme had stuff stored in the well deck from all the other compartments they were rehabbing so couldn't get to the fire (or possibly even find it) until it had a good head start on them.
Funny thing about accidents, everyone says "Accidents will happen." But when one does everyone dissects it and says it shouldn't have happened. We'll find out what happened here when the safety report is issued.
If you want to see a bad Navy fire go to youtube and search "Trial by Fire- A Ship Fights for Life". We learned a lot from that little barbecue.
(Safety Officer and damage control trainer, USS Luce DDG-38 1986-1990)
 

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A shipmate and I went aboard Forrestal while she was dry-docked in Norfolk, after the fire. I think we went over to pick up a transmitter part from their stores, the exact details escape me now. We had a reasonably legitimate excuse to be sightseeing. I recall the giant hole punched through the heavy steel flight deck, exposing burnt-out berthing compartments; rather disturbing to see.
 

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This is a very interesting thread. It is great to read all of the insight that folks who were in the Navy are posting about this. And to all of you who were or are in the military....... I appreciate it and thank you for your service to our country.
 

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A shipmate and I went aboard Forrestal while she was dry-docked in Norfolk, after the fire. I think we went over to pick up a transmitter part from their stores, the exact details escape me now. We had a reasonably legitimate excuse to be sightseeing. I recall the giant hole punched through the heavy steel flight deck, exposing burnt-out berthing compartments; rather disturbing to see.
The FORRESTAL fire almost cost us a future senator and presidential candidate. John McCain was in one of the A4 Skyhawks that was hit by the Zunni rocket and was at the center of the original blaze. IIRC, the bomb that cooked off and wiped out the aviation firefighting teams fell off of his aircraft. He barely escaped... only to be shot down, captured, and spend 5 years in the Hanoi Hilton.

Speaking of burned berthing compartments, I was fortunately NOT with the hose team that found the only casualty in the CONYNGHAM: the operations officer, still in his stateroom. I understand that it was not pretty. Most of the guys on that team had nightmares about that.
 
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