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Discussion Starter #1
Latest edition
(Fairly) well detailed.


Multi road names... 4 road numbers each.
MSRP:
D.C., $140... DCC w/ESU Loksound $200.
LHS prices ~$125 or ~$150.

Strong puller!
Ten 50' boxcars up a 3% grade.
40+ cars on level track (astounding for a 4-axle diesel!).
A friend has two of these, and I can vouch for this.


Not fitted with separate grabs. A detail kit is available, which requires a little work (utilizing drill-points, etc).

Although the Bachmann 'DCC On Board' model is much cheaper, and just as well detailed, this Walthers Mainline version will pull 3 times more cars.

On the other hand however, my gorgeous Athearn Genesis Black Widow GP9's were the same price, and are superbly detailed, with separate grabs, proper cut levers, and sundry prototype specifics. But even they won't pull what these Walthers' will.

MRRPR0919_10.jpg
MRRPR0919_12.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
My most-often utilized switchers are Geeps and RS11's.
My Genesis GP9's see a lot of duty in terminals, yards, and industrial sites. They'll cut out 15 to 18 cars at a time without overheating. The Atlas Gold RS11's will also.

For super heavy duty switching, my BLI SW1500 will cut out 25 cars, and comfortably haul them anywhere all day long.
But the new Walthers Mainline GP9's will easily put that on a lower shelf.
20190128_182004~3.jpg
20190128_174945~2.jpg

BTW, the older (previous) Walthers version was a much cheaper Trainline model.
 

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What was in the high nose section that wasn't there in the low-nose version?
 

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What was in the high nose section that wasn't there in the low-nose version?
I wondered that myself recently. Wikipedia says...

Originally the short hood of the locomotive was the same height, which is referred to as a high-nose or, confusingly, high short hood. This was originally done to avoid union conflicts, as the high nose ensured that two crewmen (one on each side of the cab) were required in order to see both sides of the track. After this issue was resolved, the height of the short hood was reduced to increase visibility, creating a low-nose or low short hood locomotive. Some locomotives that were originally built with a high nose were later modified to have a low nose. Lately it has become common to make the short hood not only lower but also full-width, creating a wider nose which is usually referred to as a North American Safety Cab.
 

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That’s interesting, but as per the original question, what was inside that part of the high hood?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
That’s interesting, but as per the original question, what was inside that part of the high hood?
The high hoods generally had more room for stuff like a steam generator, circuit boxes, and climate control equipment.
With the advent of the lower hood, those things were relocated elsewhere.
 

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I wondered that myself recently. Wikipedia says...

Originally the short hood of the locomotive was the same height, which is referred to as a high-nose or, confusingly, high short hood. This was originally done to avoid union conflicts, as the high nose ensured that two crewmen (one on each side of the cab) were required in order to see both sides of the track.


That seems like a BS explanation personally. (And if you view the article, an editor has marked that as "needs citation".) IMO that is bunk. Especially since you had at least two or three crew anyways, each with their own jobs besides "looking at both sides of the track". (Engineer, brakeman, flagman)

One thing to keep in mind that for a lot of early roadswitchers, they were built with the LONG hood being the front of the engine. And crews were used to the boiler of a steam engine being out in front, so visibility wasn't much of an issue as you think.

Eventually more RRs and builders specified the short hood as the front, and ultimately the hoods were lowered for visibility.

AND.... remember that for general-purpose or passenger assigned units, that's where the boiler was installed. A non boiler/steam generator equipped unit would have some extra space there, but the overall design of the engine remains the same.
 

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I agree with cv in the post above this one.

In the early years of the diesel transition, tradition was the rule.

When hood-unit style diesels first arrived on the scene, I reckon that most railroads wanted them with the long hood in front because "that's the way it was on steam locos", so why change it?

And the short hood, if it wasn't housing a large piece of equipment like a steam generator, was also "high" because it matched the styling of the long hood.

After a while, a few railroads "got smart" and started ordering their GPs and SDs with the short hood forward, offering somewhat better visibility even though the hood was still "full height".

And finally, somebody got the idea that since there was nothing in the short hood that actually required it to "be high", why not cut it down in size for even more visibility?

There were a few "holdouts" -- Southern and Norfolk and Western. Seems like tradition ruled the roost in these companies longer than on other roads, and they mandated the long hood to be "forward" right up into the 1970's. But finally, even they had to concede to the visibility advantages of having the short hood forward...
 

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I was under the impression that train crews wanted the long hood forward because they thought it was safer.
 

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Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
Got this from our "train pimp" (he dug it out of his old stash)... a discontinued Walthers Proto Phase 1 GP9.

It needed internal cleaning and a re-lube (I don't think it was ever unboxed). Gears looked okay.
It's a later production model, with ProtoMax couplers.

This beauty is superbly detailed, with separately applied everything!
ESU Loksound, on this loco has excellent prime mover sounds, and an abundance of different horn types.

I'm a big fan of the 'trashcan' Mars lights on SP hood diesels (eventually obsoleted by ditch lights).

It's fairly powerful, (a typical 15 cars or so) but not the stump puller the new Mainline version is.

A sweet addition to my Genesis GP9's and Atlas Gold RS11's... all in Widow paint.

ProtoGP9_003.jpg


[Edit]:
If you're an SP 'purist' you probably know that their Widow hood diesels with silver/orange rear-hood stripes were mostly designated for light passenger service.
But some were in fact utilized for freight & switching.
 

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If it’s a Walthers Proto, the gears will not be cracked.....that was only on the early Life-like Proto 2000 versions....

That SP version is very nice!
 

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Maybe. Walthers continued the Proto 1000 brand for a few years before renaming it "Mainline". The key is the manufacturer: if it says Walthers, then you're good. If Life Like, you may have a gear issue.
 
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