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I am having great fun creating landforms for my N Scale layout and whilst I have/had a general idea about how it would look, it is developing intuitively, and looking good...so far !
I have a challenge. I have a flat area which will be the lake and the landform above the lake has promise to show a water source - creek, river whatever, but the topography is a challenge. I would like to create a water filled watercourse, but as it slopes slightly down, how should I lay the water in without it rushing into the lake ? I uderstand damming and that will work fine in the lake using, say Woodland Scenics water product, but if I pour liquid into the stream bed, it will just run to the lowest point, I imagine.
Does anyone have any suggestions for bodying up a sloping watercourse ? Painting layers of varnish coat on coat might work, but is there a way to use model water product ? Plant Water Green Building Grass
 

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My only thought is jacking up the end of the table so the stream bed is level until the material dries. I don't know of a lot of options for a sloping streambed unless you can find a highly viscous material that stays where you put it until it dries.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks MichaelE , unfortunately not really possible...compound angle for a start but the layout can't be jacked as it is a C shaped 2.4 x 2.4mtre baseframe. I have been reading and it sounds as though the Woodland Scenics E-Z Water product may allow pouring an angled stream and I would welcome comment from anyone who has used E-Z Water.
Thanks for coming back to me MichaelE.
 

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Use acrylic gloss gel to make your water. Water running down a significant slope isn't going to be flat anyway, and this product is excellent at making rough water. It goes on as a flat white paste, and dries to a glossy sheen. It's available at art supply stores and on line. Not exactly cheap, but worth it.
 

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I used the toilet paper method. I soaked each sheet of the TP in a mixture of 50-50 white glue and water and laid it flat on the stream bed. The slope should not be a problem. Then I took a stub type paint brush to form ripples, let it dry at least 24 hours then paint it, I used a greenish color and in the part that sloped I left plenty of white showing as rapids. I then painted layers of Mod Podge gloss allowing each layer to dry first. There is a You Tube video of this method done by a guy named Martin of Sweden. Good luck.
 

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I am having great fun creating landforms for my N Scale layout and whilst I have/had a general idea about how it would look, it is developing intuitively, and looking good...so far !
I have a challenge. I have a flat area which will be the lake and the landform above the lake has promise to show a water source - creek, river whatever, but the topography is a challenge. I would like to create a water filled watercourse, but as it slopes slightly down, how should I lay the water in without it rushing into the lake ? I uderstand damming and that will work fine in the lake using, say Woodland Scenics water product, but if I pour liquid into the stream bed, it will just run to the lowest point, I imagine.
Does anyone have any suggestions for bodying up a sloping watercourse ? Painting layers of varnish coat on coat might work, but is there a way to use model water product ? View attachment 582761
Yes. Use gel gloss medium. It looks like white cold cream, but it will dry clear. You can tint it with acrylic craft paints. Paint it on with a small spatula or with a small paint brush.
 

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Martin has great vids! And darn great English too. But the only other Swede I know for comparison was on the Muppet Show, so……
But I too recommend that TP method. If the colors are done all once it should all tie together beautifully.
 

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I have nothing to add, though I wish posters would share their reference links to videos on the subject.
I hope you share your progress on this project, good or bad.
It would be interesting to see your failures, mistakes, and fixes if any, thought we hope it works perfect and you have awesome results! Good luck!
 

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Thanks fellas. Some great suggestions here. I will have a go and post the results.But encouraged with your ideas and experiences.
A much cheaper, and still effective, alternative to acrylic gloss medium is a craft product called "Mod Podge." I bought a good-sized jar of it at Walmart and made all the water on my layout + a boat diorama, with that jar. Cost was about $3.

Traction Fan 🙂
 

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Why not do what nature does in such a case: steps in the stream?! A water filled strea stopping at a natural dam, typically a rock face them dropping down over a falls or rapids to the next level. Make each level's stream actually level. Makes for much more interesting scenery than something that belongs as a amusement park ride. The other alternative is to have the water "cut" a deeper and deeper channel as the land rises so the stream is at the same level as your lake it's full length. Also a way nature deals with such a stream in softer substrate (extreme example: the Grand Canyon). This can give you the opportunity for RR and road bridges of different types and heights. If you do put the surface of a quiet stream at a downward angle the eye will pick it up immediately as being "wrong".
 

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You can pour acrylic gloss medium as thick as you like, but the more you use, the longer it takes to dry, and the more it costs.

There really isn't much point in making really deep pours, though. You create the illusion of depth by the way you color the bottom, not by actually having more water product on the layout.
 
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