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How is this accomplished? I'm looking to weather an old passenger car to be an abandoned car turned bait and tackle shop. I'd also like to set it on some rusty rails. But I don't know how to weather the car or accomplish the rust look on the rails.

I'm looking for basics and ease of application. Not perfection. I don't want to spend hours and hours on it. Though I appreciate that it will take some time. Looking for a 20 footer, if I can get away with car guy long.

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My best advice is to search YouTube for weathering examples. That’s how I learned the techniques I use. I use an airbrush, powders, and pin wash. Powders are probably the most forgiving to start with and don’t require buying something like an airbrush, compressor, etc.
 

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Mark VerMurlen is correct. YouTube is full of videos on weathering. And there are so many different techniques!
 

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And also check on-line photos for real world examples.
 

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Another piece of advice is to select or buy some “junk” cars that you can practice on before tackling your prized models.
 

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Weathering is one of those subjects where there isn't an answer to the "How do I...?" question. Because there are about 100 different answers, all good techniques, and they all work. I'm partial to using an airbrush to put on a light coating of light gray paint, followed by dry brushing to create dirt, rust, stains, etc.

There are dozens of others. I'll second the motion for some quality time on YouTube.
 

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I recently came across this PDF for weathering locos which goes through a basic discussion of how the weathering occurs and then some simple techniques for layering different kinds of dirt, rust, and faded paint to achieve some nice results. It won't be exactly the same as for your passenger car, but there's a lot of good info that does apply to just about anything. The author makes heavy use of an airbrush, but once you understand what they're trying to achieve at each step you can mimic the results using acrylics (dry-brushing is a great art to learn!) and chalks.
 
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