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Why is there next to no modeling of yard, car weighing facilities ? Even in 1:1 scale pics/vids there seems to be very little attention paid to this ??
I will take one stab at it and guess it may be due to them only being found in huge classification yards which so few of us can fit in a layout..But there still is the 1:1.. Why so little attention ? 馃洡馃殾
 

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I think someone (on this forum) a while back actually made a working weigh station for his HO layout.
 

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I think the same think could be said about an ash pit, which I fully intended to do but... ok I'll admit it, I forgot about it. I didn't put it on my layout plan so it got lost in the gray matter.

As far as the weighing facilities, the scale test cars seem to be everywhere I look, so my guess is what John said.
 

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I am the one who built the HO weigh scales. Some things I learned along the way are that until recently (the last few years) there wasn't an easy way to make a functional scale, although one company had a setup that detected when a train was sitting on the scales and would display a random weight. However now we have arduino computers everywhere and cheap but highly-sensitive sensors for weighing a load. Then you just have to make a section of floating track attached to the sensor and stop a car on that section long enough to take a measurement.

The other thing is that a visible weigh station is highly dependent on your time period. The original style used mechanical scales and required a siding where the cars could be placed without the loco crossing the scales. I think that whole setup became obsolete sometime around the 1920's (?) when more compact devices were developed which were not affected by the loco weight. Modern railroads have a device which looks like nothing more than a small block on the inside of the rail. So scales would really only be modeled if your layout is based around the turn of the century or sometime in the 1800's. This happens to be the time period I'm working with, so I plan to have working scales on both standard and narrow gauge lines.
 
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