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Hi
I am adding weight to some of my cars that don't have weights in them. I read the NMRA standards so in other words as an example, A 4 inch covered hopper should weigh 3.0 ounces.
So I put mine on a diet scale and got a weight then I just added enough bb's to make it 3 ounces. Now is that correct? So am I supposed to initially weigh the car and then add weight to equal the standards according to length? Just checking to be sure.
I find on my switching layout the heavier the car, the better they roll and switch.
Thanks
Bill
 

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yes, it's that straight forward.

too much weight and you'll have problems going up a grade, or string lining when the heavy cars are at the back of a train going around a tighter curve (up a grade)
 

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BBs aren't the best weights unless you glue them in place.
You don't want the weight to shift, also you want it centered in the car.
You want the cars total weight to equal the NMRA standard.
NMRA weights are pretty good but a little extra won't hurt on a switching layout
with short trains and no grades.

Magic
 

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Non-magnetic weights

Hi
I am adding weight to some of my cars that don't have weights in them. I read the NMRA standards so in other words as an example, A 4 inch covered hopper should weigh 3.0 ounces.
So I put mine on a diet scale and got a weight then I just added enough bb's to make it 3 ounces. Now is that correct? So am I supposed to initially weigh the car and then add weight to equal the standards according to length? Just checking to be sure.
I find on my switching layout the heavier the car, the better they roll and switch.
Thanks
Bill
nrscroller;

If you plan on using magnetic uncoupling, you might want to use non-magnetic material for car weights. (I use brass)
Steel BBs, or other magnetic weights, can help cause a car to be pulled toward an uncoupling magnet. This often messes up the uncoupling process, particularly delayed uncoupling which is a nice feature of Kadee couplers. On the other hand, if you plan to uncouple cars with a small stick, poked into the couplers, then having magnetic weights won't mater much.

Whatever kind of weights you use, they do the most good, in terms of smooth tracking, when installed as low, and as close to the center of the car as possible. Fill up the center beam, and add weights to the bottom of a car. Replace plastic wheels with metal ones. Then the car will be less likely to tip over.

have fun;

Traction Fan:smilie_daumenpos:
 

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Hi,
You've got the right idea about weighing the cars, as others have said. I initially bought lead weights that are sold for this purpose in hobby shops but they come in 1/4 and 1/2 oz. only and are costly. I use copper pennies....around 7 pennies equals an ounce and cost less than an ounce of lead. To fix them inside cars, I use "Alene's Tacky Glue" because it is great for gluing dissimilar materials together like copper and plastic in this case. And, if you need only a slight amount of weight, one penny or two may do. You can get Alene's at most craft stores like Michaels and Joannes Fabric.

I hope this helps,
Mondo
 

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I good idea to use pennies, but I’d take it one step further and use Canadian pennies ( it will only cost you 4 cents American then) 😁
 

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FYI, Canada no longer use/produces pennies, although there are still many to be found in piggy banks and jars....:)

When making a cash purchase at a store/business, the total is rounded either up or down to the nearest 5 cents.....

Again, just an FYI....
 

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Hi,
You've got the right idea about weighing the cars, as others have said. I initially bought lead weights that are sold for this purpose in hobby shops but they come in 1/4 and 1/2 oz. only and are costly. I use copper pennies....around 7 pennies equals an ounce and cost less than an ounce of lead. To fix them inside cars, I use "Alene's Tacky Glue" because it is great for gluing dissimilar materials together like copper and plastic in this case. And, if you need only a slight amount of weight, one penny or two may do. You can get Alene's at most craft stores like Michaels and Joannes Fabric
There is always a chance that the plastic base/floor of the car will flex, and separate the glue from the weight.....then the weights will rattle and shift inside the car, and if the body has been glued to the floor, it'll soon be annoying, because you can't get at the weights to re-glue them down....you would have a car that rattles and the weights will shift around and perhaps cause problems....just an FYI...because I've been there and done that.....
 
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