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Walthers and Atlas both make them in HO code 83 track...
 
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Discussion Starter #4
Not the same thing. In the link to the picture I did, the single set of tracks is moved to align with Right, Left or Straight Through tracks.
That is what I was referring to. It's very different than 2 sets of points one right behind the other, and 2 controls.
It would require a 3 position switch however, in either manual or electric.
To me, it would much simpler.
 

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Cole, where are they on the Ross site?
I can't find them, is there a picture in there with them?
 

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Ed, it's the 204M in the Premier Line. They don't have a picture on the sight, just description.
 

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It does appear as the OP said, it would be much simpler in any 2 rail system. I'm refering to the OP's original photo.
 

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I have to admit that, it looks to be a better/simpler system. Were I inclined to build my own turnouts, I'd try it. The moving rails I think would need to be around 20% longer than than points we are used to. Que sera.
That 5 point one though, wow.
 

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The moving rails I think would need to be around 20% longer than than points we are used to.
Not sure where you get that they would be longer? If your standard points are a solid piece of rail leading from the frog, a stub rail would actually only be about as long as the points on a hinged Atlas snap-switch.

I'm just happy to be modeling turn of the century narrow gauge... gives me the opportunity to add some of these in my layout. :)
 

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Not sure where you get that they would be longer? If your standard points are a solid piece of rail leading from the frog, a stub rail would actually only be about as long as the points on a hinged Atlas snap-switch.

I'm just happy to be modeling turn of the century narrow gauge... gives me the opportunity to add some of these in my layout. :)
On standard moving point rails located within a model turnout, the rails are super thin at the turnouts entry point to facilitate easement into desired route. In the version we are speaking of here (which I happen to like) the pivot point of the moving rails, that is not in the photo you presented, would seem to me to be a bit of a 'jerk' to the wheel trucks if said rails are not long enough. Therefore, seems to me that the moving rails would need to be longer to aleviate that somewhat. Just my thoughts really. What do I know about it? Nothing-heh. Just logic in my mind.
 

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Not the same thing. In the link to the picture I did, the single set of tracks is moved to align with Right, Left or Straight Through tracks.
That is what I was referring to. It's very different than 2 sets of points one right behind the other, and 2 controls.
It would require a 3 position switch however, in either manual or electric.
To me, it would much simpler.
Not in the smaller scales. The rails would be too close together, making it to easy to pick the points.
 

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Is it just me, or does that cross bar that's maintaining the gauge of the lead-in rails look a little lightweight?

Referring to the OPs picture.
 

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No one seems to have mentioned that the 1:1 scale switches in the pics are called 'stub switches'.. They were eventually outlawed on standard gauge lines due to their dangerous nature...
 

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Dangerous in real life, but for us in the model world, maybe they solve the same problem they did back when! Although there remains the modeling problem of how to control the action without manually fuzzing with it.
 

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Ross Custom made it.
Original woody's workshop;

Manufacturers make things in order to sell enough of them to make a profit. Tooling costs are very high, so no company is going to make something that there won't be a lot of demand for. This is one of the advantages of building your own turnouts. You can make any size, shape or configuration that you need. The photo of the three-rail model says it was custom made by someone named Ross. Whoever Ross is, he probably scratchbuilt this unusual turnout because he could not buy one. The reason he couldn't buy it ready made is that there would be no profit in commercial production of a rather odd turnout that would be unlikely to sell in quantity.

Traction Fan
 
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