Model Train Forum banner

1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Anyone know how to wire the dcc track for separating or isolating to prevent total shutdown when there is a short circuit. I use NCE throttles and looked briefly at the EB1 circuit protector. Any advice will be greatly appreciated. Thank you
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,095 Posts
"Power districts" (a.k.a "blocks")

Anyone know how to wire the dcc track for separating or isolating to prevent total shutdown when there is a short circuit. I use NCE throttles and looked briefly at the EB1 circuit protector. Any advice will be greatly appreciated. Thank you
Loconut;

Power districts are basically the DCC equivalent of the track blocks used on traditional DC controlled layouts. Unlike DC control, the insulated blocks of track are not used to control which train, in which track block, gets power from which power pack.
Instead they are used for the purpose you mentioned. To break the layout down into isolated electrical sections, each on it's own circuit breaker. Your house is wired the same basic way. A short in one part of the house trips one breaker, shutting down that part of the house wiring, but leaving the other parts powered up.
To wire your layout for power districts you'll first need to decide where you want to create the boundaries between power districts to be. For instance, a yard could be one power district, and the main line another. If you have a double loop of track, then each loop could be a separate power district. Once you have your boundaries figured out, cut both of the rails of the track at the first boundary point. You can either leave the rail gaps or take up a section of track, and install an insulated rail joiners. Either way, you have just created two separate electrical sections of track. (NOTE: if you have cut your gaps in a loop of track, you will need at least one other set of gaps, in the same loop, so that the loop will be electrically broken into two half loops)
Connect a pair of power feeders from each circuit breaker to each of the power districts you have just created. That's it, you're done!
You can have as many power districts as you have circuit breakers. NCE makes a three circuit breaker board the EB3. Some others like the Digitrax PM42, have four circuit breakers. Unless your layout is very big, three, or four, power districts should be plenty. You can add more breakers if needed. The book "Basic DCC wiring" by Mike Polsgrove, explains power districts, and a lot of other aspects of DCC wiring.

good luck, have fun!

Traction Fan :smilie_daumenpos:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,619 Posts
The Digitrax PM 42 can provide power and circuit
breaker protection for up to 4 power districts.

You would feed it with your DCC bus and it's
outputs would feed the districts.

Don
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top