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Disproportionate to me is: The white building on top seems too wide compared to the structure below it.
The overhang is called a jetty and the technique jettying. It's been around since medieval times and is quite common in Europe and especially with Tudor style architecture. You get more floor space on the upper floor while the lower floor doesn't obstruct the street (or in this case, the base of the building can be closer to the tracks). Makes sense in small, tight European villages. It's also said that the upper level protects the walls of the lower level - which were often masonry - from the weather. "Back in the day" mortar wasn't as impervious to the weather as it is now.

Some even speculate that it was done because, in the Tudor period, you were taxed by your "land footprint". In towns that was your house footprint. Smaller lower floor = smaller footprint. Personally I think that's a stretch.
 

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I like the tower, BTW. It is in keeping with the rest of the layout.

Nice weathering too. Sometimes a little is enough (which I have to keep pounding into my own head).
 

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Some even speculate that it was done because, in the Tudor period, you were taxed by your "land footprint". In towns that was your house footprint. Smaller lower floor = smaller footprint. Personally I think that's a stretch.
I've heard that too, so there may be some truth in it.
 

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Taxing in Cincinnati, Ohio was that way. You were taxed based on frontage, hence houses were very narrow in front!
 

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Not sure who posted the pictures. But the thing that is obvious is that The 1:1 scale's towers do not have that long overhang, the upper portion way wider (or you could say, longer) than the lower, what i'd guess to be the mechanical room(/motors /generators/heating/linkages; upper being controls/levers/ communication equip.)
One slightly possible answer: Perhaps two different scales were packaged in the box at the manufacturer.. The lower, say, O scale, the upper HO..Otherwise it'd be fruitless to continue the detective work.
My posts have had zero to do with Michael's choice of employing it. Far as I go it's merely a curio as to this one building's history and has been in no way a criticism of it or the OPer.
Love is in the eyes the beholder, which certainly applies to trains big and small. M
 

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