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Scale O Gauge vis-a-vis 1/48 Scale

Nearly all of my freight consists are Scale (1/48), but there is considerable difference between Atlas O, K-Line Scale, MTH Premier and Lionel Standard O. I don't think I have any Lionel Standard O left. Seems to me the MTH Premier and the Atlas O are more consistent. The K-Line Scale is a little smaller in most cases, but I surmise that K-Line was making Scale of the smaller real thing. The only freight car I have left that is semi-scale is the K-Line Texas Mexican Railway Boxcar. The only way I will part with it is to have it pried from my stiff dead fingers.
 

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When I watch real trains, I've seen boxcars of varying sizes all connected together. It makes my feel better about having cars of differing dimensions in my consists.
 

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Definitely - boxcars, tan cars, gondolas and other types of the same type of car vary slightly in size in the real world. I think it is more realistic when they do on the layout. I actually like the fact there is a tiny variation between cars of different manufacturers (and sometimes even among the same, from different years' productions).

The photo below shows what I think does not work out, though, at least for me. Both are Lionel O-gauge products, a standard size (1:48 scale) Santa Fe "Map slogan" car on the left, and a traditional size one on the right. These I never run together.

El Capitans.jpg
 

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Note: Within the non-O-scale K-Line offerings there are those that use the old Marx O-27 molds & are so small that K-Line also sold them with American Flyer trucks as S-gauge cars & there are those that are comparable to Lionel's traditional O-gauge cars.
Attached is a photo of two K-line boxcars:eek:n the left, K-6454, an imitation of Lionel's classic 6464 boxcars, & on the right, K-5122—made from a Marx mold.
 

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Crap crap crap. Dad collected and handed down 15 rolling stock, 2 cabooses and 4 engines of postwar "Lionel Traditional" scale stuff. Thought I had a good head of steam going into this but it's actually an anchor. Looks like "Scale" is the place to be. Crap. :smilie_daumenneg:
 
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Don't let the scale guys get you down, Ernest. I (and many others) only run traditional O gauge and have no intention of changing. You can build a very nice, good looking layout with traditional pre war and/or post war size trains. Scale trains are great if you have room for very large curves to run them and if you're willing to pay for scale. Scale or traditional doesn't matter as long as you're having fun.
 

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But anything you buy like buildings, bridges, portals, cars and people are all the wrong size. You spend all that time and effort on a layout and it looks funny. So what's the point?
 
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But anything you buy like buildings, bridges, portals, cars and people are all the wrong size. You spend all that time and effort on a layout and it looks funny. So what's the point?
Most of our buildings are undersized, or selectively compressed, especially industrial buildings. 1/43 cars are oversized even for scale but look good anyway. Things like bridges, portals and many other things don't have an exact size in the real world, some are bigger and some smaller. These are some pictures from my recently dismantled layout. The trains are traditional/post war size. I think the scenes are convincing and look good. It might be a case of beauty in the eye of the beholder but I'm very happy with semi-scale trains. I think it's well worth the effort and I had a lot of fun with the layout and look forward to building and running the next one using the same trains. It's not necessary to spend a thousand dollars and more on a steam loco to have a fine layout.

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Definitely - boxcars, tan cars, gondolas and other types of the same type of car vary slightly in size in the real world. I think it is more realistic when they do on the layout. I actually like the fact there is a tiny variation between cars of different manufacturers (and sometimes even among the same, from different years' productions).

The photo below shows what I think does not work out, though, at least for me. Both are Lionel O-gauge products, a standard size (1:48 scale) Santa Fe "Map slogan" car on the left, and a traditional size one on the right. These I never run together.

View attachment 85154
Lee, I am not trying to argue, just trying to learn. If you like them being different then why don't you like those as your example being different?
 

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Ok, I am getting ready to build a set and would like to be somewhat accurate - my thoughts people and buildings are different sizes (a buildings footprint) in this world; however some thing have a basic standard such and floor heights 8' or 10' and then there is warehouses that may not have a standard height depending on what was going to happen in the building. But typically one wouldn't want it undersized if they wanted it to be similarly realistic.

So on average - how tall is today's loco? Or maybe a better question is, if I was to place a house or building with what would be an 8' ceiling or a 10' ceiling or a 12' ceiling what would these measurements be in inches for an average O scale?
 

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So on average - how tall is today's loco? Or maybe a better question is, if I was to place a house or building with what would be an 8' ceiling or a 10' ceiling or a 12' ceiling what would these measurements be in inches for an average O scale?
remember, O scale is 1/48 which is 1/4"=1foot, 1"=4 feet, etc.

i believe most locos are generally around 15 ft tall.
 

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Ok, I am getting ready to build a set and would like to be somewhat accurate - my thoughts people and buildings are different sizes (a buildings footprint) in this world; however some thing have a basic standard such and floor heights 8' or 10' and then there is warehouses that may not have a standard height depending on what was going to happen in the building. But typically one wouldn't want it undersized if they wanted it to be similarly realistic.

So on average - how tall is today's loco? Or maybe a better question is, if I was to place a house or building with what would be an 8' ceiling or a 10' ceiling or a 12' ceiling what would these measurements be in inches for an average O scale?
So, using 1/4"=1 foot, an 8 ft ceiling would be 2 inches high, 10 ft - 2.5 inches, 12 ft - 3 inches.

A 15 foot tall loco would be 3.75 inches high.
 

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remember, O scale is 1/48 which is 1/4"=1foot, 1"=4 feet, etc.

i believe most locos are generally around 15 ft tall.
So, using 1/4"=1 foot, an 8 ft ceiling would be 2 inches high, 10 ft - 2.5 inches, 12 ft - 3 inches.

A 15 foot tall loco would be 3.75 inches high.
Great, thanks. I was not for sure O was 1:48 scale, I was starting to feel that may have been the case but would not have bet on it - good info.

The measurements put things in perspective, that ain't quite as scary as I first imagined. Now I can start thinking think out more clearly.
 

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True O-scale is 1:48 if you live in the US, but 1:43 if you live in Europe. Add to that all the semi-scale stuff that is sized between 1:48 and around 1:55, and you can see why there is confusion about what scale O-scale really is. :D

If you wonder why there are so many 1:43 vehicles, but very few 1:48 ones, you can blame the Europeans! :p:p
 
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